She is a wizard in the operation room

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Let's say you know a doctor who is extremely adept at performing difficult surgeries. Does it make sense to say something like this about them? :

That doctor is a wizard in the operation room.

I want to know if it would be a bit strange or unusual to say something like that about a surgeon?
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Generally when you use this expression it implies that the person is only good at that specific thing and not other things?
    I had a teacher in high school that was very tall and unathletic looking except when he was on the basketball court where he was miraculously transformed into a consummate athlete.

    I could easily imagine someone referring to him as a whiz on the court. (And the implication would be that he seemed otherwise elsewhere.)
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    But generally this expression "a wizard in" has this connotation that the person is only and only good at that specific thing?

    Why is that? I don't get it.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think that most people excel at one or maybe two things in life. Some excel in sports, others in art or music, but rarely does a person excel in all things. So I don’t find this distinction remarkable at all.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    No. It merely means the person is very good at that one thing.
    Thanks. So you think if I say she is a wizard in the operating room, it does not necessarily mean she is clumsy outside the operating room right?

    For example she could also be a good cook or a good volleyball player as well but she is extremely proficient in the operating room.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Why is that? Could you please explain?

    For examples if someone is an extremely good teacher and you say he is a wizard in the classroom, it would imply that he is not good at other things?
    You overlooked something in my response, which was "but the possibility exists that you would conclude the statement ... [etc.]"

    Note that just because a possibility exists does not mean that it is necessarily the case. The possibility exists that you could win $100 million in a lottery, but that does not mean that this event will necessarily happen. My response was intended to point out that to call her "a wizard in the operating room" names only one thing she is good at, and says nothing about how good she is at anything else. As a result, there would be no contradiction in continuing the sentence in the way that I indicated.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I agree with RM1(SS): "a wizard in the operating room" refers only to that skill;
    it says nothing, pro or con, about other skills.
     
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