She is adverse/averse to do me a favor.

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jesusguime

Banned
Chinese
She is adverse/averse to do me a favor.


Hi,
Do both adverse and averse fit in the above and mean about the same? If not, could you tell me the reason? Thanks.
 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "She is averse to doing me a favor" is correct. But this is a most uncommon way of putting it.
    Check both words in our dictionary for the subtleties.
     

    jesusguime

    Banned
    Chinese
    Thanks, cyberpedant and Dimcl.

    But my online dictionary says that "adverse" also connotes the meaning of "opposed/averse." So I really can't figure out why it doesn't work in the context in question.
     

    icyblaze

    Member
    french,spanish,creol
    ADVERSE:mean, make something difficult to somebody, not favorable
    VERSE: are writing arranged in lines which have a definite beat and which often have the same sounds at the end.

    i dont know what you mean actually could you plz provide a bit more of info?
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I don't think a person can be adverse. An adverse effect, for instance, is an undesired effect (of having done something or of a medicine, etc.). Weather conditions can be adverse if they make it impossible to do something that had been planned, like if it rains when a picnic was planned or if it is too stormy for an airplane to take off.

    Averse means opposed. A person can be averse to doing something; they do not want to do it.

    I believe that averse has to be applied to people or at least to entities that have volition (a will of their own) and adverse to a phenomenon like conditions or effects.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks, cyberpedant and Dimcl.

    But my online dictionary says that "adverse" also connotes the meaning of "opposed/averse." So I really can't figure out why it doesn't work in the context in question.
    Read this and then look at the words in your dictionary again... "averse" describes a feeling/emotion. In your example, she is "averse" to doing a favour, meaning that she has a reluctance/lack of desire/dislike, etc.

    "Adverse" is more of an "action" word. It means unfavourable or contrary. Perhaps she's "averse" to doing the favour because it might have an "adverse" reaction.:)
     

    jesusguime

    Banned
    Chinese
    Thanks, my helpful mentors.
    Now I get it. "Adverse" means "not favorable." And "averse" means "opposed."
    I got confused because of the wrong translation of my dictionary.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    That's exactly right, jesusguime. It's a shame about the dictionary, but that happens sometimes, especially on-line.
     

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Regardless of the definitions of "adverse" and "averse", it seems to me that the original thought would we better expressed by saying "She is not inclined to do me a favor".
     
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