she lak a chile ‘bout gittin’ her feets wet.

Lee Jongho

Senior Member
Korean
What does "she lak a chile ‘bout gittin’ her feets wet." mean?


The complete sentence follows:
“You is as bad as Miss Pitty an’ she lak a chile ‘bout gittin’ her feets wet. Lemme cahy you.”

The source is from Gone with the Wind by Magaret Mitchel.
 
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    She is like a child about getting her feet wet.
    If she gets her feet wet she acts like a child.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It actually seems to mean the opposite of that, and I looked it up because I suspected it might.

    “You is as bad as Miss Pitty an’ she lak a chile ‘bout gittin’ her feets wet. Lemme cahy you.”

    If you read the surrounding passages, what he is saying is that Miss Pitty is bad about keeping her feet dry. Like a child (and unlike a refined Southern lady), she manages to get get her shoes and feet wet a lot. And Scarlett, who is a young Southern lady who ought to be refined in her manners, is taking after her. In the passage, Scarlett is about to step down from the train into churned up, wet, muddy ground. In her defense, it didn't look like she had many options. But the speaker is the coachman for Miss Pitty and he's come to Scarlett's rescue. He offers to carry her (in fact, he insists on it).

    "Lemme cahy you."

    It's an offer he won't let her refuse. He carries her through the mud over to the waiting coach.
     
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