she might as well be a peacock and done with it

Axelroll

Senior Member
Spanish (Spain)
Hello everybody:

I'm working on a translation of Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, and I'm having difficulties to understand the phrase which I wrote in the post title, taken from Chapter XIV. The context is as follows: Jo, one of the four "little women" (sisters), wrote a story which has just been published by a local newspaper. It's the first story of hers that appears in the press, so the whole family is very happy for her, rejoicing and celebrating the good news.

Dear me, how delighted they all were, to be sure! ... How proud Mrs. March was when she knew it. How Jo laughed, with tears in her eyes, as she declared she might as well be a peacock and done with it

I know that "peacock" means here "a vain, self-conscious person", but I'm not completely sure about the meaning of the part in bolds, although I think I know what it is. I just would like that a native English-speaker explains it to me with different words so I can translate it properly, once I understand it correctly.

Thanks for any help you might provide!
 
  • Axelroll

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Thanks, Keith, but what does the whole phrase in bolds mean in this context? Is it something like "stop praising me, or I'm going to turn into a 'peacock'"?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I would paraphrase it as:
    ... she might as well boast [about her own achievement] and stop trying not to be proud of herself or stop trying to pretend otherwise.
    :)

     

    Axelroll

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Thanks, ewie! Now I see it clearer, I believe. Let's see if I can find a good translation for that, though.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
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