She presented her free dance routine to considerable acclaim.

Hwacha

Senior Member
Korean
Full sentence: Gradually, Fuller's innovative techniques evolved into a performance she called "The Serpentine Dance," and in Feburary 1892, at the revue "Uncle Celestin" in New York, she presented her free dance routine to condsiderable acclaim.

Is it right to reconstruct the sentence to: She presented her free dance routine and got a considerable acclaim.
Also, do they usually use acclaim like that in a sentence? Can you please provide one or two example sentences?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    got a considerable acclaim.
    "Acclaim" is uncountable, so using an article is incorrect. You could say "got considerable acclaim" but it doesn't sound natural.
    Also, do they usually use acclaim like that in a sentence?
    If you're referring to the original, it sounds a standard use of "acclaim" to me.
    Can you please provide one or two example sentences?
    I believe you're required to provide the examples, and people who answer will tell you if they're all right or not.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Is it right to reconstruct the sentence to: She presented her free dance routine and got a considerable acclaim.
    No, sorry. (1) Acclaim is uncountable ... and (2) we wouldn't use get with it.

    She presented her free dance routine and won/garnered considerable acclaim.

    to [...] acclaim
    is pretty much a fixed phrase.
     

    Hwacha

    Senior Member
    Korean
    "Acclaim" is uncountable, so using an article is incorrect. You could say "got considerable acclaim" but it doesn't sound natural.

    If you're referring to the original, it sounds a standard use of "acclaim" to me.

    I believe you're required to provide the examples, and people who answer will tell you if they're all right or not.
    Sorry I could not come up with a sentence easily. I made two sentences using Acclaim in them.

    1. I have been awarded a prize for my research on molecular chemistry to considerable acclaim.

    2. The boxer knocked out his opponent within one round to considerable acclaim.
     
    Last edited:

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    1. I have been awarded a prize for my research on molecular chemistry to considerable acclaim.
    This doesn't sound right. It suggests the award of the prize was what received acclaim, not your research but I believe you mean your research received acclaim.
    I'd say "My research received considerable acclaim, and I was awarded a prize".
    2. The boxer knocked out his opponent within one round to considerable acclaim.
    This sounds better. By the way, I suggest "within a round" or "in the first round".
     
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