she runs/run

Alejhox

Member
Spanish - Peru
Hi, Everybody.
I was listening to the creep song by Radiohead when I noticed that he said many times the verb "run" after the pronoun "she", and I asked myself why not "she runs". Could anybody explain to me why this happens? - I got one clue, maybe he's trying to say "she's run". That makes better sense, isn't it?
Thank you in advance!
 
  • Artifacs

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    Aquí está la letra de Creep (aunque no sé si es la correcta) Radiohead - Creep Lyrics | AZLyrics.com

    Parece que si dice she run en algunas partes.
    Recuerdo que en la canción de "The Police" Everything she does is Magic, Sting dice a veces she do en vez de she does. También es muy común que se omita la «s» de tercera persona singular en las canciones de Ray Charles, (como en Hit the Road Jack, por ejemplo).

    Quizá algún nativo pueda resolver este misterio.
     

    Chiqui Tibum

    New Member
    English - US
    Mucha de la música pop está basada en antiguas canciones de afroamericanos en EEUU (blues, por ejemplo). Como estos venían de poco recursos y se les negaba muchas veces educación formal, la letra contiene errores gramaticales. Cuando otros músicos descubrieron el poder de esta música, les gustó lo "auténtico" de estas canciones y se pusieron a cantarlas exactamente como eran - aún con los errores gramaticales. Artistas siguen haciendo esto para que suenen más "auténticos".

    Un gran ejemplo de esto son las canciones que Led Zeppelin les robó a Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker et cetera.
     

    Alejhox

    Member
    Spanish - Peru
    Aquí está la letra de Creep (aunque no sé si es la correcta) Radiohead - Creep Lyrics | AZLyrics.com

    Parece que si dice she run en algunas partes.
    Recuerdo que en la canción de "The Police" Everything she does is Magic, Sting dice a veces she do en vez de she does. También es muy común que se omita la «s» de tercera persona singular en las canciones de Ray Charles, (como en Hit the Road Jack, por ejemplo).

    Quizá algún nativo pueda resolver este misterio.
    Gracias por tu respuesta, y si concuerdo contigo. Hay ocasiones donde las letras de la canciones tiene ciertos errores gramaticales. Pero si me gustaría conocer la respuesta de un nativo. :thumbsup:
    (Espero que suceda :))

    Mucha de la música pop está basada en antiguas canciones de afroamericanos en EEUU (blues, por ejemplo). Como estos venían de poco recursos y se les negaba muchas veces educación formal, la letra contiene errores gramaticales. Cuando otros músicos descubrieron el poder de esta música, les gustó lo "auténtico" de estas canciones y se pusieron a cantarlas exactamente como eran - aún con los errores gramaticales. Artistas siguen haciendo esto para que suenen más "auténticos".

    Un gran ejemplo de esto son las canciones que Led Zeppelin les robó a Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker et cetera.
    Gracias por tu respuesta. Tienes razón hay canciones que son escritas o cantadas con errores gramaticales, quizás solo para que siga el ritmo. Pero me gustaría conocer el punto de vista de un nativo. :thumbsup:
    (Espero que suceda :))
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi, Everybody.
    I was listening to the creep song by Radiohead when I noticed that he said many times the verb "run" after the pronoun "she", and I asked myself why not "she runs". Could anybody explain to me why this happens? - I got one clue, maybe he's trying to say "she's run". That makes better sense, isn't it?
    Thank you in advance!

    Well, maybe because it's not supposed to be "She runs," but

    She — run, run, run, run

    where "run" takes an imperative meaning, adding urgency. After all, the singer is screaming that part.

    Maybe
     

    Alejhox

    Member
    Spanish - Peru
    Well, maybe because it's not supposed to be "She runs," but

    She — run, run, run, run

    where "run" takes an imperative meaning, adding urgency. After all, the singer is screaming that part.

    Maybe
    Thanks for your reply. Uhm! Good point, but have you considered my idea that he's trying to say "he's run"? - What do you feel?
     

    Chiqui Tibum

    New Member
    English - US
    If you know the singer, Thom Yorke, you know that he likes to sing words repeatedly and go off on tangents as the muse strikes him. I suspect that this "run, run, run run" part was him doing that in the studio and the producers wanting to capture it on the album a bit. There are also a lot of rock stars that do the same thing in the part of a song that is more "moving". Besides that, grammar mistakes and repetition were both elements found in the black music that popular white artists were emulating/copying. And these models are still very much alive in modern pop music.

    It is always possible that he meant "she ran" and is using a common grammar mistake that certain native speakers make. (See, for example, a phrase from the American South like "She ain't here. She run to the store." - meaning "She isn't here. She ran to the store.".) However, I don't he is doing that here.
     
    Last edited:

    Alejhox

    Member
    Spanish - Peru
    If you know the singer, Thom Yorke, you know that he likes to sing words repeatedly and go off on tangents as the muse strikes him. I suspect that this "run, run, run run" part was him doing that in the studio and the producers wanting to capture it on the album a bit. There are also a lot of rock stars that do the same thing in the part of a song that is more "moving". Besides that, grammar mistakes and repetition were both elements found in the black music that popular white artists were emulating/copying. And these models are still very much alive in modern pop music.

    It is always possible that he meant "she ran" and is using a common grammar mistake that certain native speakers make. (See, for example, a phrase from the American South like "She ain't here. She run to the store." - meaning "She isn't here. She ran to the store.".) However, I don't he is doing that here.
    Thank you so much Chiqui for your reply. I really appreciate your interest in my question.
    I understand Thom Yorke's background and his quirks, that's a good fact to consider, but I would like to know what you think about my idea. Do you think could be that possible?
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I think it's possible to overanalyze song lyrics and read into them something that just isn't there.
    'Run run run' is much easier to sing than 'Runs runs runs' and it sounds much better.
    "He's run" doesn't make much sense.
    Songs are not meant to be analyzed in a grammatical context :)
     

    Alejhox

    Member
    Spanish - Peru
    I think it's possible to overanalyze song lyrics and read into them something that just isn't there.
    'Run run run' is much easier to sing than 'Runs runs runs' and it sounds much better.
    "He's run" doesn't make much sense.
    Songs are not meant to be analyzed in a grammatical context :)
    Thank you so much for your reply. Do you mind telling me why you consider that "she's run" does not make much sense?
    I'm studying English and I'd like to know some reasons or the point of view of a native speaker.
    Thank you in advance.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Previously you said 'He's run', which made no sense when the lyrics are describing a woman.
    And the previous line is 'She's running', so why change the tense?
    (And I am a native English speaker).
     

    Alejhox

    Member
    Spanish - Peru
    Previously you said 'He's run', which made no sense when the lyrics are describing a woman.
    And the previous line is 'She's running', so why change the tense?
    (And I am a native English speaker).
    Yes, you're right. I made a mistake, I wanted to say "she's run", and my idea was if the singer might have wanted to say the following:
    "She's running out the door (run)
    She's running out. She's run, run, run, run".
    (I'm glad to talk with a native English speaker :thumbsup: )
     
    Top