She smiles approbation/approvingly.

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arueng

Senior Member
CHINESE
Johny: Mom, can I help you with the chores?

She smiles approbation/approvingly!



Hi,
I ran across "she smiles approbation" in an online dictionary. And it reads odd to me! And I think I would say "she smiles approvingly" in the above context.
For the sake of curiosity, do both of the two versions sound good to you? Thanks.
 
  • Aidanriley

    Senior Member
    English
    The first one is wrong, and I agree with you in that it should be approvingly. Could you paste us the entire sentence from the dictionary or a link to it? Perhaps something else in the context has caused the sentence to be phrased that way.
     

    vivarachel

    Member
    Japanese
    Seems odd to me as approbation is a noun. As smiles is a verb, your adverb approvingly which has the same meaning is a much better choice.

    It is possible to say
    Her smile showed her approbation.
    She smiled with approbation.

    Your friend,
    Rachel
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    Seems odd to me as approbation is a noun. As smiles is a verb, your adverb approvingly which has the same meaning is a much better choice.

    It is possible to say
    Her smile showed her approbation.
    She smiled with approbation.

    Your friend,
    Rachel
    Thanks, my friend, Rachel.

    Your suggestions read very nice.
    Did you see the source I just pasted in post 2?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I looked at the link and I think the other example is just as flawed as this one:

    "We have not yet received [URL="http://tw.dictionary.yahoo.com/dictionary?p=approbation#"][URL="http://tw.dictionary.yahoo.com/dictionary?p=approbation#"]the [/URL][/URL]approbation of the Minister for carrying out the plan."

    Approbation, in my experience, is only used to mean an approving attitude towards something, not an official act of approval, except in church government as a specialized term. For example, I wouldn't say "the plans for the new shopping mall have received approbation by the city council" to mean that they have officially approved the plan. That would mean that they have made expressions of approval (as in "I like this plan" or "this plan will serve our community well").
     

    vivarachel

    Member
    Japanese
    Just looked. I think it is wrong at best maybe a typo and they accidently left out with.
    She smiles with approbation. My opinion of course.

    Smiles plus noun is grammatically incorrect.
    You wouldnt say for example, She smiles sadness/anger etc.

    Rachel
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    Thanks.
    Unfortuantely, the dictionary is incorrect in this case.
    Thanks, Aidanriley, for pointing out the error.

    I looked at the link and I think the other example is just as flawed as this one:

    "We have not yet received [URL="http://tw.dictionary.yahoo.com/dictionary?p=approbation#"][URL="http://tw.dictionary.yahoo.com/dictionary?p=approbation#"]the [/URL][/URL]approbation of the Minister for carrying out the plan."

    Approbation, in my experience, is only used to mean an approving attitude towards something, not an official act of approval, except in church government as a specialized term. For example, I wouldn't say "the plans for the new shopping mall have received approbation by the city council" to mean that they have officially approved the plan. That would mean that they have made expressions of approval (as in "I like this plan" or "this plan will serve our community well").
    Thanks, JamesM, for the interesting info.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It would be more usual to say she smiles her approbation. It's a bit of a formal word, so it might be clearer if we use more familiar words: She smiles her acquiescence/approval/acceptance. It's still rather a formal construct, but I would say these are all normal things to say.

    We can use bare abstract nouns as objects in such situations: She signified assent/understanding. She nodded permission.

    The original example sounds grammatical to me, just quite an unusual way to say it when there are more familiar ways.
     
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