She told you to go home

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q_006

Senior Member
US and English
How would you translate that in Japanese? If possible in kana and romaji please.
 
  • Demurral

    Senior Member
    BCN
    Catalan, Spanish
    I would say: (kanojo-wa) (anata-ga) kaeru you ni iimashita.

    (彼女は)(あなたが)帰るように言いました。 かのじょはあなたがかえるようにいいました。

    Hope it helps but... wait for native opinions. ^^
     

    lammn

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese
    Thanks, uchi! :)

    Is "kaerina" a casual way of speech?
    Can it be applied to other verbs as well? eg. yamena, iina, kikina...?
     

    q_006

    Senior Member
    US and English
    Thank you very much. I also would like to know how a native speaker would say it.

    I came up with initially: Kanojo wa anata ga uchi ni iku o hanashita.

    It seems I was a bit off.
     

    q_006

    Senior Member
    US and English
    <Her name> wa "uchi e kaerina" tte.

    <Her name>は「うちへかえりな」って。
    A few questions:

    "She told you to go home" --> <Her name> wa uchi e kaerinatte.

    1. Is <her name> = you or <her name> = she?
    2. The anata ga and to iimashita is left out because it's already understood; correct?
    3. Can you use "ni" instead of "e"?
    Native speakers please chime in as well :)
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    Saying in English : "she told you to go home" can be rendered in a few different ways in Japanese, depending on the degree of "imperativeness" you want to express :
    - she told you " go home !" : uchi (he) kaete to (kanojo wa) iutta (he =é)
    - she told you that you'd better go home : uchi (he) kaetara ho ga ii to (kanojo wa) iutta
    - uchi he kaerina is also good, the ending -na being a "mild imperative" like "and if you went back home ?"
    - also : "kaetara (doo) ?", short and simple = "what about going back home ?".
     

    q_006

    Senior Member
    US and English
    so "e" and "kanojo wa" can be left out.
    also could you do this: "uchi (e) kaete yo to (kanojo wa) iutta" ? (yo = !)
     

    q_006

    Senior Member
    US and English
    I am confused about three (last questions, really) things.
    You have "uchi....." "kanojo wa". It could just be the books i've read but how come the subject (topic) doesn't come first (as in: "kanojo wa uchi .....")? What's the difference between "e" and "ni"? Lastly, leaving out the particle doesn't change the meaning of the sentence?

    Doumo arigatou gozaimasu, mina-san!
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    You can permute (as often) the subject in Japanese.
    Basically : uchi e = towards home, "to home" // uchi ni : "in home", at home
    uchi e kaeru : go (back) home , uchi ni iru/nokoru : be home, stay home
     
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