she was happy for a little while in the Boulevards or in the <Bois or the Luxembourg Gardens>

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 376, chapter 17) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Connie and her sister were visiting Paris. ……)

Connie found herself shrinking and afraid of the world. Sometimes she was happy for a little while in the Boulevards or in the Bois or the Luxembourg Gardens. But already Paris was full of Americans and English, strange Americans in theoddest uniforms, and the usual dreary English that are so hopeless abroad.

What do Bois and Luxembourg Gargens refer to please?
Thank you in advance
 
Last edited:
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The activities of Parisians in the Bois, particularly the long promenades in carriages around the lakes, were often portrayed in French literature and art in the second half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries.
    Bois de Boulogne - Wikipedia
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you. I get it. In a Chinese version, Bois is translated as forest.

    But are the Luxembourg Gargens, which are in the country Luxembourg, close to Bois?
    And I understand Boulevards to be the streets in Paris, and Bois is a park in Paris too, while the Luxembourg Gardens are in Luxembourg, which is close to Paris. Is that right?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The Luxembourg Gardens is a park in Paris. These are all pleasant places for tourists to visit in Paris. The famous Champs Elysees Avenue is a "boulevard". The "Boulevards" Connie would have visited are the broad main streets in the centre of Paris, with shops, cafes, restaurants, and theatres. Strolling in the parks or along the Boulevards of Paris was a pleasant activity for people of leisure.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    The gardens are in Paris: Jardin du Luxembourg - Wikipedia

    "Bois" does mean forest. It also means wood, as in what you use to build a house or make furniture. I don't know how you translate into Chinese. If you're translating proper names from one European language to another you usually leave the spelling the same. And that brings up Russian and Greek, which also have different alphabets. Perhaps it's done phonetically. (?)
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    I totally understand. Thank you again
    If you're translating proper names from one European language to another you usually leave the spelling the same. And that brings up Russian and Greek, which also have different alphabets. Perhaps it's done phonetically. (?)
    Yes. I do leave the spellings the same, but I think I should add forest behind Bois so that our readers can know it's a forest.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Except it isn't what we'd call a forest. It's a wooded park. Bois means ' a wood', an area of land with numerous mainly deciduous trees, not 'a forest'. This is a park with a lot of trees a lake and all sorts of amusements. In English we might call it the 'Boulogne Woods'.
    Here's a 19th century painting of one of the walks in it.

     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top