she was so overcome with her happiness

sami33

Senior Member
arabic
Hi

I think "overcome" in the expression is an adjective. And I wonder if "she was so overcome with her happiness" in the context means "she was overwhelmed by her happineee". This is the context:

So the months followed one another, and first the trees budded in the woods, and soon the green branches grew thickly intertwined, and then the blossoms began to fall. Once again the wife stood under the juniper-tree, and it was so full of sweet scent that her heart leaped for joy, and she was so overcome with her happiness, that she fell on her knees.

Source:The Juniper-Tree By the Grimm Brothers

Thanks
 
  • morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    Yes (with the exception of the typos), this is what it means. She was deeply emotionally affected.
    A dictionary though goes a long way in answering questions like this one.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I think it's a verb in the passive, for what it's worth---not an adjective.
    Wordreference:
    overcome/əʊvəˈkʌm/
    verb (past overcame; past part. overcome)succeed in dealing with (a problem).■ defeat.
    ■ (of an emotion) overwhelm (someone).


    I think I would use "to be overcome by" but "to be overwhelmed with". As morzh says, it is the same concept.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    I think it's a verb in the passive, for what it's worth---not an adjective.
    Wordreference:
    overcome/əʊvəˈkʌm/
    verb (past overcame; past part. overcome)succeed in dealing with (a problem).■ defeat.
    ■ (of an emotion) overwhelm (someone).


    I think I would use "to be overcome by" but "to be overwhelmed with". As morzh says, it is the same concept.
    Yes it is.
    The emotion has overcome her, so she was overcome with emotion.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I can't explain this well, but here goes:

    overwhelmed/overcome with happiness = more positive (I think this is your context)
    overwhelmed by happiness = more negative

    I'm not sure if that is your question.
     

    sami33

    Senior Member
    arabic
    Thank you. Yes is that what I ask about. But what do you mean by "more positive" and "more negative", please?
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    That is when "overwhelmed by happiness", the strength of the emotion may actually have some negative side effects. Like fainting. or something else.

    So when the possible negative side of the strong emotion (even a positive one) needs to be shown, "by" is used.

    To me personally "overwhelmed" by itself has some negative connotation, whether used with "by" or "with".

    We recently discussed "by" vs "with". End of last week, I think.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Yes, that's a good example from morzh. It's really a nuance, but it's a slight difference.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top