She (was/wasn't) fast enough to join the rugby team.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by antonisimo, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. antonisimo Senior Member

    Español, Perú
    Are both sentences right?

    She was fast enough to join the rugby team.

    She wasn't fast enough to join the rugby team.

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge! :)
     
  2. morzh

    morzh Banned

    USA
    Russian
    Grammatically I think these are OK.

    But, is only me, or are the sentences ambiguous?
    Can it be construed as a) She was not considered a fast enough runner to join the team, and b) She did not act fast enough, and so there were no openings left for her in the team.
     
  3. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    Either one can be correct, but they can't both be correct at the same time.
     
  4. morzh

    morzh Banned

    USA
    Russian
    Wouldn't they nullify each other? :) Like in annihilation?
     
  5. eyePod Senior Member

    English - California
    Hi Antonio,
    Both are correct. What exactly are you worried about? morzh is correct, they could mean she could run fast enough or she signed up fast enough (or not) That is an English limitation. But, the answer to your question is that they are both right.
     
  6. eyePod Senior Member

    English - California
    Antonio didn't ask if they could logically be true at the same time, otherwise you are right they are matter and anti-matter at the same time :D
     
  7. morzh

    morzh Banned

    USA
    Russian
    I would then change it into something like :
    "She wasn't a fast enough runner....." / "She was a fast enough runner.....".
    This way the ambiguity is gone.
     

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