she's a heifer , heffa

AmaryllisBunny

Senior Member
In this case, I am referring to it's use in slang. It can be spelt "heffer" or "heffa." This word is used most often in AA[E]V (African American [English] Vernacular) and is used to insult someone. In general it means "bitch" but can apply particularly to someone who is fat.

Example: Ooooh that heffa, she don't even know what comin! (That bitch doesn't even know what's coming [her way]!)

I can't think of a word in French that matches the register or meaning.

Perhaps "Quelle grosse salope! Ell se mem pa …" ?
 
  • Dr Ralph

    Senior Member
    USA
    Français
    Grosse vache est rarement reçu comme un compliment. Il y a aussi grosse truie, qui n'est pas plus flatteur.

    (Sinon, dans le genre backhanded compliment, on trouve sirène ; mi-femme, mi-thon...)
     

    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    In African American Vernacular it seems to approach the level of "bitch." Would "grosse vache" meet that level?

    Also, "heifer/heffer" can be directed towards any woman, even if they are skinny or unknown.
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    "Fat Cow!" in British. Very insulting! "Vielle vache!"
    "Fat Old Cow" - don't know if "Grosse vieille vache!" works in French:confused:
    Gross can also be used in English (borrowed from French:confused:) - "Your wife ain't fat! She's gross!" - Gross rhymes with close (adjective) and verbose!
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    Fat old trout in English too. also offensive even without the word stupid in front of fat.
    What is a truie? typo???? I actually read it at first as "truite" !!!!!!:):D
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Je traduirais par « grosse truie » (Dr Ralph et archijacq) si je voulais mettre l'accent sur le poids de la personne.

    Et par « grosse vache » (uncle Bob) ou « maudite vache » (ça, c'est québécois) en parlant d'une femme "bitch", pas nécessairement obèse.

    @ guillaume : truie = sow or "she pig". Not to be confused with truite = trout. ;)
     

    djweaverbeaver

    Senior Member
    English Atlanta, GA USA
    Hi,

    To me, a heifer/heffa can apply to ANY woman, not just overweight ones, particularly in AAVE. I think @AmaryllisBunny might confuse some by first stating that it refers to fat women then changing and stating that it can refer to fat and skinny women alike.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Hence my writing both vache and truie.

    I wouldn't say grosse truie about a skinny person.
    But if the person who calls the woman a heifer wants to emphasize on "fat" rather than "bitch" (or may be both?) then it works.

    I might however say grosse vache even, even if she isn't overweight, about a woman who's really bitchy.

    By definition, a heifer is :
    A young cow before she has had her first calf.
    Now, that would be génisse in French. But of course, it isn't a word we'd normally use as an insult.

    So once again, it has to do with context. ;)
     
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    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Je ne sais pas au Canada, mais pour moi "grosse vache" (comme "grosse truie") fait référence seulement à une femme grosse (j'utilise "vache" comme adjectif et non comme nom pour désigner quelqu'un de pas sympa/dur. Ex : "T'es vache de ne pas m'avoir laissé de gâteau !"). En tant que personne maigre, me faire traiter de "grosse vache" me laisserait pantoise puis me ferait sûrement rire.
    Je n'arrive pas bien à saisir "heifer", je dois dire, mais si on parle d'une femme, grosse ou non, d'une façon très familière et péjorative, est-ce que "poufiasse" ou "pétasse" ne pourrait pas marcher ?
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    The dimensions of a "heffa" have now been explained but does the term have any implications with respect to the age of the lady (bovine "heiffers" being young)?
     
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    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    It doesn't have to do with age (at least to my knowledge). It is just a derogatory term used towards another female — that female may even be unknown to the speaker.

    Edit: (I am sorry for the confusion in the beginning :confused: )
     

    djweaverbeaver

    Senior Member
    English Atlanta, GA USA
    I agree, it has no implications age-wise. It's like bitch but slightly less derogatory, although I think that younger people might use bitch a little more readily and freely.

    And @DearPrudence, it doesn't carry the sexual, (im)moral implications of either pouffiasse or pétasse, especially not the former. It's more or less just used as a derogatory term for any woman.
     

    neil.g.burton

    New Member
    English
    I definitely agree with you. It is used as a derogatory term for any female that is getting on your nerves: a nasty heffa, a conceited heffa...
     

    Dr Ralph

    Senior Member
    USA
    Français
    So, if we don't go in the direction of:
    In general it means "bitch" but can apply particularly to someone who is fat.
    Should we try something more generic like "meuf" or "gonzesse"?
    Or has it to be a bitch, therefore a "connasse" or "pétasse" (among others)? I'm lost.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Je ne sais pas au Canada, mais pour moi "grosse vache" (comme "grosse truie") fait référence seulement à une femme grosse (j'utilise "vache" comme adjectif et non comme nom pour désigner quelqu'un de pas sympa/dur. Ex : "T'es vache de ne pas m'avoir laissé de gâteau !").
    Salut DP :) Moi aussi, il m'arrive d'utiliser « vache » comme adjectif. Mais là je l'ai écrit dans ce sens québécois :
    [Québec][Familier][Péjoratif]Femme, fille qu’on déteste. Qu’est-ce qu’elle t’a encore fait, cette grosse vache-là? Cette fille-là est une petite vache! Maudite vieille vache!
    Alors une petite vache est moins vache qu'une grosse vache, et une maudite (vieille) vache est encore plus vache. :D

    To be honest, I'm lost too. It seems to me that there isn't any "fit for all" solution and that it depends on context.

    I found by fluke a forum page entitled AAVE slang that I wasn't aware of. This is extracted from it:
    Heffa (n) corruption of « Heifer », literally, a young cow; A pejorative term for a disagreeable, undesirable woman; used as an insult. Littéralement : une jeune vache, une génisse ; greluche (arg.), garce (pop.), salope (vulg.), peau de vache (pop.), radasse (vulg.)
     
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