She's hanging out the wash

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, I wonder if Hungarian is the only language which can use an intransitive separate verb for hanging out the wash.
How would you translate this short dialogue? Thanks.

- Where's mother?
- She's hanging out the wash.

Hungarian:

- Hol az anyu?
- Tereget.
 
  • apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek:

    -«Πού είναι η μητέρα;» [pu ˈine i miˈteɾa?] --> where is mother?
    -«Απλώνει τα ρούχα» [aˈploni ta ˈɾuxa] --> she's laying out the clothes
    or
    -«Απλώνει την μπουγάδα» [aˈploni tim͜ buˈɣaða] --> she's laying out the wash.
    The verb used is «απλώνω» [aˈplono] --> to spread, spread out, lay out, stretch < Classical v. «ἁπλόω/ἁπλῶ» hăplóō (uncontracted)/ haplô (contracted) --> to develop, unfold (with obscure etymology).
    Bonus etymology:
    «Ρούχο/ρούχα» [ˈɾuxo] (neut. nom. sing.), [ˈɾuxa] (neut. nom. pl.) --> cloth, clothes < Byz. Gr. neut. «ῥοῦχον» rhoûkhon < South-Slavic ру́хо --> clothes, garment
    «Μπουγάδα» [buˈɣaða] (fem.) --> wash < Ven. bugada < Late Lat. būcāta
     
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    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Hello, I wonder if Hungarian is the only language which can use an intransitive separate verb for hanging out the wash.
    How would you translate this short dialogue? Thanks.

    - Where's mother?
    - She's hanging out the wash.
    Czech:

    - Kde je máma?
    - Věší prádlo.

    It's not sufficient to say just "věší". I can't rule out that somebody speaks that way but for me it sounds extremely unnaturaly.
     
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    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    In Japanese:
    We use a phrase 洗濯物を干すsentakumono o hosu.

    "母さんは?"kaasan wa? : kaasan=mother, wa=particle for topic, "how about mother?"
    "洗濯物干してるよ"sentakumono hoshiteru yo " sentakumono=washing, acc., hoshiteru=hosu[干す:dry off]+te(i)ru[continuous, be -ing]=be drying off, "she is drying off the washing"
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    Swedish:
    Var är mamma? (Where is mother?)
    Hon hänger upp tvätten (She hangs up the washing) or
    Hon hänger tvätt (She hangs wash) or
    Hänger tvätt (hang wash)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch, like English: Zij is de was aan het uithangen (progressive tense) / Zij hangt de was uit...

    Is it somehow possible to analyse this tereget? It is very peculiar indeed, or so it seems to me.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    In Japanese:
    We use a phrase 洗濯物を干すsentakumono o hosu.

    "母さんは?"kaasan wa? : kaasan=mother, wa=particle for topic, "how about mother?"
    "洗濯物干してるよ"sentakumono hoshiteru yo " sentakumono=washing, acc., hoshiteru=hosu[干す:dry off]+te(i)ru[continuous, be -ing]=be drying off, "she is drying off the washing"
    I must say I have found your culture so exotic I had expected you do not hang out the wash and do something different... :) I wonder what method poor people used in Edo period i.e. hosu does not express if you hang or spread the wash, right? Using the verb dry is possible in Hungarian but it is not the moment when you hang out the wash....
    Very interesting you used the phrase "kaasan wa?" In Hungarian we can use the the simple word "Anyu?" in the similar way using a falling-rising tone. I don't think IE languages can make it...

    Dutch, like English: Zij is de was aan het uithangen (progressive tense) / Zij hangt de was uit...

    Is it somehow possible to analyse this tereget? It is very peculiar indeed, or so it seems to me.
    Yes, it is possible.... and only now I've realized that we do not use the verb "hang" but the verb "spread" just like Greeks....In the past poor people did the washing at rivers and did not hang it out at all.....deeper cultural-historical analysis would be interesting :)

    tereget < terít [terít to spread + frequentativ suffix -gat/-get "mos-mosogat" [wash] / terít-tereget..etc]
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    As you have already thought about that, hosu doesn't mean hang out or spread. hang out is translated to 吊るす(tsurusu).
    If you want to make clear hang out the wash, you can also say "洗濯物を吊るしてるよ(sentaku mono o tsurushiteru yo, she is hanging out the washing)" and it makes sense as well. (but I think using hosu is much better than other one)

    Though hosu literally means to dry off it generally indicates hanging out the wash with a peg and that is what comes to our mind from a such expression.
     

    M Mira

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    There are two verbs for that in Mandarin:
    曬/晒 shài "to expose to sun" 衣服 yīfú "clothes"
    晾 liàng "to passively dry" 衣服 yīfú

    曬/晒 can also mean "to show-off"(vt), while 晾 can also mean "to be inattentive to"(vt), but I believe these usages are quite colloquial.
     

    mataripis

    Senior Member
    Hello, I wonder if Hungarian is the only language which can use an intransitive separate verb for hanging out the wash.
    How would you translate this short dialogue? Thanks.

    - Where's mother?
    - She's hanging out the wash.

    Hungarian:

    - Hol az anyu?
    - Tereget.
    Tagalog: Nasaan ang Inay?- Nagsasampay ng nalabhan.
     

    frugnaglio

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Italian:
    Dov'è la mamma? A stendere il bucato.

    Stendere actually means to unfurl, to spread out, to stretch out (much like “terít” :))
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Hello frugnaglio and welcome to the forum...we hope to see you here a lot... :)
    Yes, I think there are more languages using the verb "spread"...interesting you used "a stendere"....but that would be off-topic...
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Hello, I wonder if Hungarian is the only language which can use an intransitive separate verb for hanging out the wash.
    How would you translate this short dialogue? Thanks.

    - Where's mother?
    - She's hanging out the wash.

    Hungarian:

    - Hol az anyu?
    - Tereget.
    In Macedonian you can say:

    - Каде а мама?
    - Пружува.


    The longer variant is: Пружува алишта. lit. "[She]-is-stretching clothes."

    Even though the verb пружува has several meanings, when used in present tense the main meaning is "hanging out the wash" especially if we know from the context it is about the mother.
     
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    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Sardinian :

    - In ue ch'est mamma? (Lit. "in where there is mom?")
    - Ch'est fora tendende sa roba / sos pannos (Lit. "there is out stretching the clothes")
     
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