She's having her hair cascade.

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newname

Senior Member
Vietnamese
Hi,

In my country women often wear their hair long and after washing it, they find somewhere windy around their house and let the wind dry their hair. They do this by bending forward and hang their long hair in a cascade. Some do not wear their long hair in a bunch or tie it up, but they just let it fly around their shoulders, which looks very sexy.

Are these sentences natural?
1. Mom's having her hair cascade at the front door to dry it.
2. I really like the way she has her hair cascade.
3. I won't have you girls having your hair cascade in the yard from now on. Don't you see those bastards ogle you?

I'd appreciate your help.

Thank you.
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi,

    In my country women often wear their hair long and after washing it, they find somewhere windy around their house and let the wind dry their hair. They do this by bending forward and hang their long hair in a cascade. Some do not wear their long hair in a bunch or tie it up, but they just let it fly around their shoulders, which looks very sexy.

    Are these sentences natural?
    1. Mom's having her hair cascade at the front door to dry it.
    2. I really like the way she has her hair cascade.
    3. I won't have you girls having your hair cascade in the yard from now on. Don't you see those bastards ogle you?

    I'd appreciate your help.

    Thank you.
    There are two aspects to this
    1. the use of 'to have'
    2. the use of 'cascade'

    Instead of 'have' I would use 'let': Mom's letting her hair cascade at the front door to dry it.

    The verb 'cascade' with respect to hair is correct but unusual. I don't think it would be understood without an explanation such as you gave.
     

    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Thanks a lot, Biffo,

    But I don't think it's unusual because macmillandictionary.com even has an example, 'dark hair that cascaded to her shoulders'.
    What is the idiomatic verb or phrase?

    Thank you.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In my experience, we usually say 'hair cascades' in relations to something. You could say, "letting her hair cascade to the ground" (if it reached that far) or "letting her hair cascade down her back", but "letting her hair cascade" by itself sounds incomplete.

    You could say something like "letting her hair hang freely."
    When a woman releases her hair from a bun, we call that "letting her hair down".

    These are possible:
    1. Mom is at the front door, letting the wind blow through her hair to dry it.
    2. I really like the way she lets her hair cascade down her back.


    The third one is difficult, because of cultural differences. We are less likely tell girls that they are inviting unwanted attention by drying their hair where other people can see them.

    [A side note: "Bastards" would be considered offensive by some people. Possibly you could say ruffian instead, but I am not sure that it means what you want to say. If you are interested in discussing this further, you should open another thread, explaining what you have in mind.]
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Cascade can be used in the way the macmillan dictionary says,sure, but it describes a style of hair, not an action designed to dry hair.
     

    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Thank yous,

    Please look at the attached picture. So if I mean to describe the way she wears her hair, I'd say
    1. Her hair cascades to her breasts.:D (Is there a better way to describe this hair style without mentioning 'breasts'?)
    And if I mean to say she's in the action of letting the hair down, I'd say
    2. She's letting her hair hang freely.
    3. She's letting her hair down.

    Am I correct?

    Thank you a lot.
     

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    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I agree with Suzi - particularly because her hair doesn't actually reach breast level. I'm also going to add that at least to me, "cascade" implies fairly long hair, and this photo doesn't fit my definition of fairly long. But it could be that others have different ideas about "cascade" or "fairly long."
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Btw you can say she is letting her hair hang free but avoid using the phrase letting her hair down unless she actually has an upswept style which she is actively unpinning. That phrase is much more widely used to suggest a mental attitude to having fun.

    As Just kate says. Your image does not conjure a real cascade to me, but it could be a cultural variation. Google Cheryl Cole to see my idea of cascading (albeit mostly hair extensions!)
     

    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Thanks a lot suzi,

    I must confess I cannot see any difference between Cheryl's hair and that in my picture. Maybe Cheryl's is slightly thicker and longer. However, I am very happy.

    P.S
    You must have made a slip of the pen when you wrote, ' hang free', right?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Cheryl's hair is usually very voluminous and curly. That seems like part of the notion of cascade to me! Your image is straight anf flat. Not really a cascade to me.
     
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