she's hung up and putting on her shoes.

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
Hi, can hung up (She hangs up the phone) be used as an adjective? The dictionary only says that hung up can be an adjective when it means " informal emotionally confused or disturbed." Do you think the sentence should be "She's hung up and is putting on her shoes"? Thanks

The next morning, Fertility is whispering on the telephone to someone. I wake up, and she's dressed and out of bed asking, "Do you have an eight a.m. flight to Sydney?"....By the time she notices me watching her, she's hung up and putting on her shoes.

Soruce: Survival, Chuck Palahniuk
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The sentence you're asking about and the one you've apparently quoted from Survival are the same, so your question is confusing.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    The sentence you're asking about and the one you've apparently quoted from Survival are the same, so your question is confusing.
    I thought it should be She's(present perfect tense) hung up and is putting on her shoes instead of the original sentence: she's hung up and putting on her shoes.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Sometimes people use "she's" to mean "she has". You can say "She's hung up and is putting on her shoes" to mean "She has hung up the phone and is putting on her shoes".

    There's nothing wrong with Palahniuk's sentence. It doesn't mean "She's emotionally confused and is putting on her shoes".
     
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