She's taking after her mother in this respect

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dreamlike

Senior Member
Polish
Hi everyone,

suppose my sister exhibits a behaviour similar to that of her mother, that is to say my mother, too. It's not a quality such as, for instance, naivety, but rather a kind of behaviour. In the situation given, would it make sense to say: She's taking after her mother in this respect.

Am I right in saying that it is advisable to use the present continuous in the context given? I can't point to the exact reason, but it somehow sounds good to me.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo DL. I would interpret She's taking after her mother to mean She's starting to take after her mother:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hullo DL. I would interpret She's taking after her mother to mean She's starting to take after her mother:)
    Yes, that's how I would interpret it, too:cool:.

    I'd say that the 'unmarked' version is She takes after her mother.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thanks for all your answers. :thumbsup: I didn't allow for the possibility that using the present continuous would make the sentence mean 'starting to take after her mother', but it makes perfect sense when I think about it.
     
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