Shit and bugger!

Rotty

Senior Member
Italian
Ciao a tutti,

mi scuso per l'espressione poco gentile, ma capita di dover tradurre anche queste. Il contesto è una telefonata tra sorelle. La prima dice alla seconda che nel weekend avrà molto da lavorare. La seconda le ricorda che sarebbero dovute andare a trovare i loro genitori. La prima, essendosene dimenticata, esclama :warn:"Shit and :warn:bugger!". Secondo voi, posso semplicemente tradurlo con ":warn:Cazzo!" oppure ":warn:Merda!"?

Grazie!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Anja.Ann

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao, Rotty :)

    Non puoi evitare una traduzione quasi letterale, presumo? :) Un semplice :warn:"Vaff! :warn:Me n'ero scordata!" potrebbe andare bene?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Io in italiano direi proprio o :warn:cazzo! oppure :warn:merda!|per rendere :warn:shit and :warn:bugger!.;) Sì, lo so, non sono una signora!:D

    Ma in effetti andrebbe bene qualsiasi espressione del genere....;) Rotty, tu che cosa diresti in italiano in una situazione del genere? Quale sarebbe la tua "reazione" verbale?
     

    Holymaloney

    Senior Member
    English (UK) / Italian - bilingual
    Ciao :)!
    Io andrei con un semplice '...:warn:merda!:warn: Me ne ero scordata...'
    @Rotty, devi mettere i warning signs nel tuo post :D
    @Ciao AA ...e buona settimana! :) ;)

    EDIT: yooo hoooo LC luv! Hugs :)
     

    Rotty

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Vicendo a Siena direi "Maremma maiala!" ma è troppo regionale, perciò anche io sarei orientata a "Cazzo!" dato che il testo che sto traducendo è pieno di queste espressioni gergali e volgari. Grazie di nuovo a tutti per il confronto sempre utilissimo!
     

    Anja.Ann

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao, Holy! :) :)

    Mi è venuto in mente un innocente ":warn:porca trottola!" :D ... ma temo che non regga l'immediatezza dell'espressione originale!

    Una buona e bella settimana anche a te! :)
     

    ginestre

    Senior Member
    I don't think you can use only one word in the Italian: the original expression chains two separate expletives together, as if to underline her deliberate choice to swear. It's not just a casual :warn:'Ah, shit!' that slipped out unthinkingly, so I don't think :warn:'Cazzo!' alone does it justice.
    I also feel that the use of :warn:'bugger' as an expletive ejaculation is a particularly regional English (ie, not even British) usage- am I right, fellow natives from other shores?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    II also feel that the use of :warn:'bugger' as an expletive ejaculation is a particularly regional English (ie, not even British) usage- am I right, fellow natives from other shores?
    Is it? I'm from London - it's very common there as an expletive ejaculation and two very good friends of mine (one's Irish and the other's Scottish) use it all the time, as did my my paternal grandfather, who was born in Burnley.;). Where are you from, Ginestre?;)

    NB. North Americans don't use it, I know that. The Australians do, if I remember rightly.;) I've never heard it in Africa (but to be honest I never really took that much notice, so I'd better shut up!:D)
     

    ginestre

    Senior Member
    Is it? I'm from London - it's very common there as an expletive ejaculation and two very good friends of mine (one's Irish and the other's Scottish) use it all the time, as did my my paternal grandfather, who was born in Burnley.;). Where are you from, Ginestre?;)

    NB. North Americans don't use it, I know that. The Australians do, if I remember rightly.;) I've never heard it in Africa (but to be honest I never really took that much notice, so I'd better shut up!:D)
    I'm grew up in London and 'did' uni in Yorkshire: it was common in both places- as it is in Australia. But Southern Irish friends of mine use it very self-consciously, and I know that Americans find it offensive.

    The point of my observation about geographical usage was that coupling some colourful Italian regionalism with :warn:cazzo might do the trick.
     

    giginho

    Senior Member
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Well, Fellas, I would say:

    "Ohhh :warning:cazzo! (m'ero dimenticato)" with enphasis on the "c" of cazzo, dragging the "ooooohhhh".

    It works with "ohhhh mmmmerda!" as well, dragging the "m"

    I love forbidden expressions!!!!!! Very usefull stuffs!
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Is it? I'm from London - it's very common there as an expletive ejaculation and two very good friends of mine (one's Irish and the other's Scottish) use it all the time, as did my my paternal grandfather, who was born in Burnley.;). Where are you from, Ginestre?;)

    NB. North Americans don't use it, I know that. The Australians do, if I remember rightly.;) I've never heard it in Africa (but to be honest I never really took that much notice, so I'd better shut up!:D)
    Who says North Americans don't use it? It's considered vulgar and gross, but I remember it going the rounds of my elementary school class (too stupid for high school, I guess). We even had expressions like :warn:"bugger balls", and :warn:"You bugger!". Of course it's up to the Italians to decide how they prefer to translate it, but a more literal translation like :warn:"Cacche e Caccoli!" might be most amusing, too. :)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Who says North Americans don't use it? It's considered vulgar and gross, but I remember it going the rounds of my elementary school class (too stupid for high school, I guess). :)
    Sorry, I meant you don't use it as an expletive ejaculation like we do:;)

    Oh, :warn:bugger! :)warn:Bugger me sideways, :warn:bugger me backwards :D:D).
     

    Bella63

    Senior Member
    British-English
    Sorry, I meant you don't use it as an expletive ejaculation like we do:;)

    Oh, :warn:bugger! :)warn:Bugger me sideways, :warn:bugger me backwards :D:D).
    Hi LC;)
    I quite agree,
    (sadly) I used the word way before I knew what it actually meant :D
    Bella
     
    Last edited:

    Bella63

    Senior Member
    British-English
    My mother doesn't know what it means either (or so she claims: but she won't use it anyway).:D

    Giginho: to :warn:bugger = :warn:inculare. A :warn:bugger = uno che pratica la sodomia.:D
    well I won't tell you how I felt when I found out "what" it meant Hahahahahaha (maybe I was 5!!)
    Bella
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Sorry, I meant you don't use it as an expletive ejaculation like we do:;)

    Oh, :warn:bugger! :)warn:Bugger me sideways, :warn:bugger me backwards :D:D).
    I think basically in AE :warn:"bugger" is used for "caccola" (without all the seriously dirty BE connotations). In AE we prefer our numerous expressions employing the word :warn:"Shit" (...-head, You're ...ing me!, Don't give me that ..., You're full of ..., Up ... creek without a paddle, etc, etc), or the "f" word.
     

    beacher

    Senior Member
    Veneto Dialect and Italian
    Ciao guys,

    I don't know what the Rotty's book talks about, but if it owed some colourful languarge inside, she might use :warn:"porca puttana":warn:. Many time I found it reading some interesting books

    What do you think about? Is it too much vulgar?:eek:
     

    giginho

    Senior Member
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Ciao guys,

    I don't know what the Rotty's book talks about, but if it owed some colourful languarge inside, she might use :warn:"porca puttana":warn:. Many time I found it reading some interesting books

    What do you think about? Is it too much vulgar?:eek:
    It's not about the vulgarity I'm having trouble imaging "porca puttana" in this context but about its lengh. Maybe you can use the shorter way for it, saying ":warning:porca troia:warning:". Another funny way that boys use in this case (at least in the generation having to serve in the army) was ":warning:puttana:warning: la naja".
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Ain't that a 'booger' ?
    I checked both :warn:"bugger" and "booger" in the dictionary. The first gives "caccola" as a secondary meaning. The second is perhaps more specific - so perhaps you're right (associated also with the term "bogie"). Since this is a word I've mostly heard orally (and in elementary school), I wasn't sure about the spelling. However they strike me as alternate spellings of the same word - except that the BE and AE connotations seem to change quite a lot.

    I have another use of "bug" or "bugging" (no :warn: because it isn't DIRTY). My father used to order us to "Stop bugging!" which we interpreted as "rough-housing," as somebody inevitably got hurt (if we didn't stop). It took us years to realize that what he really meant was "Stop bugging (ME)!" (i.e. "Non (mi) scocciare!") :)
     

    cercolumi

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Visto che il parere di un madrelingua è richiesto, mi faccio avanti, anche non sono uno studioso di grammatica e magari verrò corretto a mia volta. :)
    Secondo me:
    Mi sa che il traduttore non è mai stato in Italia.
    Credo/Penso/Ritengo che il traduttore non sia mai stato in Italia.

    "Mi sa", al mio orecchio, non richiede il congiuntivo. ;)

    PS: giusto per tornare leggermente in topic, proporrei un :warn:merda, merda, merda! (sembra di no ma è solo due lettere più lungo)
     
    Last edited:

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    Visto che il parere di un madrelingua è richiesto, mi faccio avanti, anche non sono uno studioso di grammatica e magari verrò corretto a mia volta. :)
    Secondo me:
    Mi sa che il traduttore non è mai stato in Italia.
    Credo/Penso/Ritengo che il traduttore non sia mai stato in Italia.

    "Mi sa", al mio orecchio, non richiede il congiuntivo. ;)
    Concordo.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I checked both :warn:"bugger" and "booger" in the dictionary. The first gives "caccola" as a secondary meaning. The second is perhaps more specific - so perhaps you're right (associated also with the term "bogie" That's what we say in BE for "caccola".:)). Since this is a word I've mostly heard orally (and in elementary school), I wasn't sure about the spelling. However they strike me as alternate spellings of the same word - except that the BE and AE connotations seem to change quite a lot. :warn:Bugger and bogie are completely different words to me.;)

    It took us years to realize that what he really meant was "Stop bugging (ME)!" (i.e. "Non (mi) scocciare!") :)We say that too, but it has nothing to do with "bugger".:)
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    I agree with london calling - bogie and booger (I've heard both) are caccola and :warn:bugger is a different word which has a totally different (and much ruder) meaning :)

    PS. Grazie a tutti per la spiegazione della mancanza di congiuntivo con 'mi sa' :D
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top