shits and giggles

patucas

New Member
Español - España
Hola a todos. Como podríamos traducir: "the wedding sounds like shits and giggles all around". Me imagino que será algo así como "parece que la boda va a ser muy divertida" o "la boda suena como de mucha risa". Alguien me ayuda? Muchas gracias
 
  • Embeleco

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Nunca lo había oido en ese contexto...Si lo he oido en el contexto de "for shits and giggles" que significa algo asi "para estupideces y risas". Quisiera saber que piensan otros...
     

    sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    Embeleco, tu traducción es buena. Pero "shits and giggles" es bastante vulgar, y usualmente se usa con sarcasmo. No sé como traducirlo precisamente, pero tal vez sería algo como "la boda suena como de mucha diversión y pendejadas / mamadas para todos" o algo así.
     

    bondia

    Senior Member
    English-England
    Embeleco, tu traducción es buena. Pero "shits and giggles" es bastante vulgar, y usualmente se usa con sarcasmo. No sé como traducirlo precisamente, pero tal vez sería algo como "la boda suena como de mucha diversión y pendejadas / mamadas para todos" o algo así.

    Si, es bastante vulgar, pero, si así consta en el original ¿por qué suavizarlo en la traducción?:)
    Habiéndo dicho esto, no se me ocurre cómo decirlo... pero seguro que algún nativo te lo resovlerá...
     

    grindios

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - United States Midwestern
    In the US, you wouldn't hear that phrase as written. You might hear "We got married for shits and giggles" but a wedding cannot be shits and giggles, at least in the US. The phrase basically means "for fun."

    And NEVER change the source/target text, no matter how vulgar.
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    "(to do sth for) shits and giggles" is moderately vulgar and fairly common in vernacular British English. The meaning is as mentioned above by grindios.
     
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    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree with posts #5-8, but does anyone know how this expression came about? I understand "for giggles," but I've never heard anyone use "shits" in this meaning outside of this particular expression (to do something just for shits and giggles), and I can't imagine how the first person to say it would have arrived at that.

    Could it simply be an intentional vulgarization of the expression "to do something just for kicks"?
     

    grindios

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - United States Midwestern
    I agree with posts #5-8, but does anyone know how this expression came about? I understand "for giggles," but I've never heard anyone use "shits" in this meaning outside of this particular expression (to do something just for shits and giggles), and I can't imagine how the first person to say it would have arrived at that.

    Could it simply be an intentional vulgarization of the expression "to do something just for kicks"?
    Rice University says:

    adverb derivation
    just for fun. To do something "for shits and giggles" is to do it just because you feel like it, or maybe you have nothing to lose. It is said that this phrase is a more vulgar form of "for kicks and giggles", which is probably a combination of the two phrases "just for kicks" and "just for laughs", but with "laughs" replaced with "giggles". Both the phrases "just for kicks" and "just for laughs" mean essentially the same thing as the neologism "for shits and giggles". This is an example of how slight changes over time can result in an entirely different phrase.

    for shits and giggles - Neologisms
     

    gato radioso

    Senior Member
    spanish-spain
    ¿Sería entonces algo como "Parece que la boda va a ser del carajo/de puta madre"? (lo digo por ser "divertido", pero en un registro vulgar)
     

    ElFilósofo

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    I'm 70 years old. I've spent half my life in California and half in New York. And this is absolutely the first time I've ever heard this expression. Just sayin'.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    It was in written usage as of 1969.

    The Bible 2.0

    I find it very hard to believe that that book was written in 1969. It includes some very modern words, such as "whatevs," "McCheesyfries" (the whole Mc... fad came after the Sixties), "crossdressing," and "bro." Just to name a few of many. Having been alive and sentient in 1969, I know that we just didn't talk like that then.
     

    rajulbat

    Senior Member
    English - United States (Houston)
    I find it very hard to believe that that book was written in 1969. It includes some very modern words, such as "whatevs," "McCheesyfries" (the whole Mc... fad came after the Sixties), "crossdressing," and "bro." Just to name a few of many. Having been alive and sentient in 1969, I know that we just didn't talk like that then.
    I had the same thoughts, to be honest. Other sites have the book as being published in 1969 as well, e.g., archive.org, AbeBooks, but it's likely they are getting the date from Google. There is no copyright page in the scan available on Google and Archive (same scan). For second best we have 1984 (Organs of the Media) and 1985 (Beatdom).

    Edit: At least the Beatdom one is misdated also; contains references to Harry Potter. The 1984 one could also be misdated. The lesson learned here is that Google Books metadata is not reliable.
     
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