shoe

< Previous | Next >
  • Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    In Dutch: schoen
    [which was originally the plural form of schoe (compare English shoe), but it got re-interpreted as a singular form. Modern days plural is schoenen.]

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    TraductoraPobleSec

    Senior Member
    Catalan & Spanish
    In Catalan, SABATA :) Then there is the more formal CALÇAT, which is a more general word referring to shoes. Sabata would be countable (generally in pairs: un parell de sabates) and calçat is a non countable noun :)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portuguese there is also calçado, but I wouldn't translate this as "shoe", exactly. It is to "shoe" as "attire" is to "suit".
     

    SerinusCanaria3075

    Senior Member
    México, D.F. (Spanish)
    In Greek (Modern):
    παπούτσι (papútsi)

    Latin:
    calcĕus.
    It can also mean "boot"

    Sardinian ("common"):
    bota.
    càrtu.
    crapíta.
    (here)

    Sardinian (Campidanesu):
    bottinu; sabatta.

    Sardinian (Logudoresu-Nuorese):
    iscarpa/iscàrpa.
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    In Greek (Modern):
    παπούτσι (papútsi)
    Is it a compound? If so please tell me the meaning of the components. It reminds me of Persian pâpush which was once used as a word for "shoe" especially kind of shoe that women wore in the home. means foot and push is present root of pushidan (to wear).
     

    SerinusCanaria3075

    Senior Member
    México, D.F. (Spanish)
    Is it a compound? If so please tell me the meaning of the components. It reminds me of Persian pâpush which was once used as a word for "shoe" especially kind of shoe that women wore in the home. means foot and push is present root of pushidan (to wear).
    That's interesting. In Albanian there also seems to be "këpucë" for shoe, but I honestly don't know if it's a compound of foot like in Persian.

    About Modern Greek:
    "πους (pus)" seems to be an alternative of foot, "πόδι (pódi) / póda in Griko-Salentino, a southern Italian dialect of Koine" seems to be the more common one (natives please correct me if I'm wrong). Pódi would lead to the following:

    In Old Greek (I guess Ancient) "υπόδημα" resembles Modern "υπόδημα (ipódima)", but since I'm no Greek expert I can only say it's an alternate for shoe based on some Google images for Greek "shoe".

    In any case the pus in "patsi" most likely has something to do with foot, I can't think of a verb though.
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    That's interesting. In Albanian there also seems to be "këpucë" for shoe, but I honestly don't know if it's a compound of foot like in Persian.

    About Modern Greek:
    "πους (pus)" seems to be an alternative of foot, "πόδι (pódi) / póda in Griko-Salentino, a southern Italian dialect of Koine" seems to be the more common one (natives please correct me if I'm wrong). Pódi would lead to the following:

    In Old Greek (I guess Ancient) "υπόδημα" resembles Modern "υπόδημα (ipódima)", but since I'm no Greek expert I can only say it's an alternate for shoe based on some Google images for Greek "shoe".

    In any case the pus in "patsi" most likely has something to do with foot, I can't think of a verb though.
    In Romanian the word papuc means "slipper". The word comes from German, with a possible Greek source.

    :) robbie
     

    SerinusCanaria3075

    Senior Member
    México, D.F. (Spanish)
    In Romanian the word papuc means "slipper". The word comes from German, with a possible Greek source.
    I'm not so sure about the German influence. According to DEX it has Turkish influence, from papuç, but I think you will agree with me that it’s not likely to have such influence. Like the explanation says: “simple footwear, wore at home”, which is what Alijsh also said about Persian:

    Alijsh said:
    It reminds me of Persian pâpush which was once used as a word for "shoe" especially kind of shoe that women wore in the home. means foot and push is present root of pushidan (to wear).
    Persian: پاپوش -> sound.
    Which also shows up as slipper in the following languages:
    Albanian -> papuçe
    Hungarian -> papucs (image/audio)
    Russian -> бабуша [babusha]
    Plus most Romance languages: babucha (Spanish), babbuccia (Italian,Sardinian), babouche, babutxa, babòza (Romagnolo), papuc.

    And of course the variant of slipper: pantufla, pantofola, pantoufle… which must have come from Greek “παντόφλα (pantófla)”
    But we’re probably getting off topic here (maybe a new thread starting at post #22?;)).
     

    cute angel

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    In Catalan, SABATA :) Then there is the more formal CALÇAT, which is a more general word referring to shoes. Sabata would be countable (generally in pairs: un parell de sabates) and calçat is a non countable noun :)
    In standard Arabic it's hithaa th like in those and also we use Sabat or sabata for small ones it's the first time I knew that it is Catalonian word that's great.We use sabat out side in addition to the buts .

    It's sko in Swedish and pantof in Romanian.

    :) robbie
    we use pantof too it's Romanian it's for winter shoe that we wear inside the house

    Also we use sandelle(tarbaka) for summer shoe .

    Also mashmak made of plastic also mankassa or mokassa

    All these are kinds of shoes here in Algeria
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    I'm not so sure about the German influence. According to DEX it has Turkish influence, from papuç, but I think you will agree with me that it’s not likely to have such influence. Like the explanation says: “simple footwear, wore at home”, which is what Alijsh also said about Persian:


    Persian: پاپوش -> sound.
    Which also shows up as slipper in the following languages:
    Albanian -> papuçe
    Hungarian -> papucs (image/audio)
    Russian -> бабуша [babusha]
    Plus most Romance languages: babucha (Spanish), babbuccia (Italian,Sardinian), babouche, babutxa, babòza (Romagnolo), papuc.

    And of course the variant of slipper: pantufla, pantofola, pantoufle… which must have come from Greek “παντόφλα (pantófla)”
    But we’re probably getting off topic here (maybe a new thread starting at post #22?;)).
    You're right SerinusCanaria3075! I mixed up pantof (< German) and papuc (< Turkish).

    :) robbie
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    Is it a compound? If so please tell me the meaning of the components. It reminds me of Persian pâpush which was once used as a word for "shoe" especially kind of shoe that women wore in the home. means foot and push is present root of pushidan (to wear).
    "Pushândan/Pushundan" also means "to cover", doesn't it? That may be a factor, no?
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Yes but 'soulier' is quite old-fashioned... Otherwise you could also say 'godasses' or 'pompes' which are both sland too.
    So, in French, the "normal" word is "chaussure"
    but it's funny to see that there are also colloquial words which are very different:
    "godasse", "pompe", "grole" and sometimes, we use the English "shoes" (only in the plural form) :)

    Note: all those words are feminine.
     

    kusurija

    Senior Member
    Lithuania Czech
    In Czech:
    Obuv (as sort of atricles in shop)
    Bota, střevíc, polobotka (shoe); lakýrka(shining)
    mokasín, semiška,
    sandál, opánek (for summer)
    lodička, pantoflíček, střevíček(ladie's)
    baganče, křuska (those in army)
    válenka, důchodka (cheap for winter)
    bačkor(k)a, papuče, pantofle, trepka, přezůvka, capáček(for home)
    vietnamka (for beech)
    cvička, plátěnka, teniska, kecka, tretra, kopačka(sport)
    přeskáč
    holínka, gumovka, gumák
    dřevák
    kamaše, koženka

    In Lithuanian:
    batas
    šliurė
    šlepetė
    guminis
    aulinis
     

    kusurija

    Senior Member
    Lithuania Czech
    In Czech:
    Obuv (as sort of atricles in shop)
    Bota, střevíc, polobotka (shoe); lakýrka(shining)
    mokasín, semiška,
    sandál, opánek (for summer)
    lodička, pantoflíček, střevíček(ladie's)
    baganče, křuska (those in army)
    válenka, důchodka (cheap for winter)
    kozačka (ladies for winter - tall)
    bačkor(k)a, papuče, pantofle, trepka, přezůvka, capáček(for home)
    vietnamka (for beech)
    cvička, plátěnka, teniska, kecka, botaska, tretra, kopačka(sport)
    přeskáč, lyžák, horalka,
    holínka, gumovka, gumák, kaloše/galoše
    dřevák
    kamaše, koženka

    In Lithuanian:
    batas
    šliurė
    šlepetė
    guminis
    aulinis
    kedas
    kurpė, klumpė,
    I made some addings, what I had forgotten ;) ..maybe it's not all yet..As for now, it's 43 synonyms in Czech language. Has someone more :idea: ?
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    Hebrew: נעל (NA-al)
    Intersting, in Arabic Na'al نعال is slipper; na'l نعل is the sole of the shoe.
    Turkish nal is a “horseshoe” - which would still be in the semantic realm of this thread. In fact, Arabic نعال [na3al] can also mean a “metal ferrule on a sheath”, so why not also a metal ferrule on the horse’s foot? Ottoman Turkish nal is written نال.
    Old Greek ...
    ὑπόδημα is never used among Greeks today – except in compound words like υποδημα-τ-ο|ποιός [ipoðimatopjós], “cobbler”, lit. “footwear maker” – and even that is only used in writing (f.ex. on the window of a shoe shop). The Modern Greek word for “shoe” is παπούτσι [papútsi] from Turkish papuç. To the extent that this word is being used in Turkish – mostly in the form pabuç – it will rather be a slipper than a shoe”. The common word for “shoe” in Turkish is ayak|kabı which literally means “foot covering” – very much like Persian pâpush, see #30: Abbassupreme’s correction of Alijsh in #22.
    Scarpa in Italian.
    Many of the words for “shoe” will invariably be used in plural. Hence Italian scarpe. A propos plural, see the case of Dutch in #9.


    Italian ciabatte means “slippers” – compare the same word (etymologically speaking) in Spanish and Portuguese (#2 and #7).
    Latin: calcĕus.
    Mostly used in plural
    calcei, I’d say, but one should perhaps consult a Latin dictionary (and not only copy information from the web ;)).
    :) :)
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    ...Italian ciabatte means “slippers” – compare the same word (etymologically speaking) in Spanish and Portuguese (#2 and #7)...
    We have a similar word too! In Romanian it's the regional word ciubotă and it means "boot". It is said to be related to the Italian ciabatta, French savate and Spanish zapato. Its origin is listed as being from the Turkish çabata.

    :) robbie
     

    SerinusCanaria3075

    Senior Member
    México, D.F. (Spanish)
    We have a similar word too! In Romanian it's the regional word ciubotă and it means "boot". It is said to be related to the Italian ciabatta, French savate and Spanish zapato. Its origin is listed as being from the Turkish çabata.
    Actually I think he meant that Spanish zapato and Portuguese sapato come from Turkish zabata.:)

    Mostly used in plural calcei, I’d say, but one should perhaps consult a Latin dictionary...
    All I know it that "calcĕus" is the nominative singular form for shoe, from where Spanish/Portuguese get calzado/calçado (from the verb calcĕo,calcĕāre) which like Outsider said a while back it sometimes can be used as a synonym for shoe but it's mostly used for "size/attire" at a department store.
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    We have a similar word too! In Romanian it's the regional word ciubotă and it means "boot". It is said to be related to the Italian ciabatta, French savate and Spanish zapato. Its origin is listed as being from the Turkish çabata.
    There is a Tatar word which may be the etymon of Romanian ciubotă. Turkic loanwords in Romanian are known to have two different sources. ;)

    In Modern Turkish there is also a word çabata, but it means some sort of “over-sized sandwich” and must be a loan from Italian. Italian ciabatta - perhaps more frequently sciabatta when I come to think of it - and its Romance cognates have nothing to do with the Tatar word. The similarity must be a pure coincidence.
    :) :)
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    I think it's more likely that zapato/sapato came from Arabic because of their presence in the Iberian Peninsula but I can't prove anything, this is just an idea and please don't shoot me.
     
    Actually I think he meant that Spanish zapato and Portuguese sapato come from Turkish zabata.:)

    Heyo,

    Zabata , I have never heard of this word ... maybe it is from a different Turkic language. Now I'll write the words for shoe in Turkish, my beautiful eclectic language :)

    Ayakkabı - used by everyone

    Pabuç

    İskarpin - used by older generations

    Bot, çizme etc for different type of shoes

    PS: The Turkish word "çaput" may be the origin of the Spanish word ...I can't think of another word that looks like "zabata" But "çaput" does not mean "shoe" but it means a piece of cloth or old clothes etc..
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    All I know it that "calcĕus" is the nominative singular form for shoe, from where Spanish/Portuguese get calzado/calçado (from the verb calcĕo,calcĕāre) which like Outsider said a while back it sometimes can be used as a synonym for shoe but it's mostly used for "size/attire" at a department store.
    I've just remembered the proper translation of calçado: footwear.
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    PS: The Turkish word "çaput" may be the origin of the Spanish word ...I can't think of another word that looks like "zabata" But "çaput" does not "shoe" but it means a piece of cloth or old clothes etc..
    And why would you think of any Turkish word in the first place? The G
    üneş Dil Teorisi, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Language_Theory, has got no supporters any more, not even in Turkey. ;) çaput is a word hailing back to Old Turkish and belonging to a semantic sphere which is wholly irrelevant to this thread.
    Wow!
    So the Indonesian word sepatu eventually comes from Turkish!
    Most definitely not!
    :) Quod erat demonstrandum. :)
     
    And why would you think of any Turkish word in the first place?
    If you speak/understand some Spanish

    zapato.

    (Del turco zabata).
    Here is the whole link. I am not saying that any Turkish word is the origin of the Spanish word "zapato". It is "REAL ACADEMIA ESPAÑOLA " that says the origin of the Spanish word zapato is the turkish word "zabata".

    Originally Posted by Spectre scolaire
    çaput is a word hailing back to Old Turkish and belonging to a semantic sphere which is wholly irrelevant to this thread.
    And "çaput" is the only Turkish word I can think of, that looks like zabata. If you think "real academia espanola" is wrong , then you should warn them not me.:D
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    Sorry, avok, I didn’t even open the link provided by SerinusCanaria3075 in #42 simply because I didn’t know it was a link. ;) Now we are doubly aware of the fact that Real Academia Española is no better than any of us in not furnishing sources for our etymological conjectures; Turkish zabata :eek: I’d eat my hat! :D This is – as far as I am able to judge – nothing but pure guesswork! With all respect, it only gets worse when somebody tries to find a Turkish word out of the blue which might have some phonetic resemblance to the etymon furnished by the Royal Academy.

    Loanwords are the result of languages in contact – in one way or another. What sort of contact situation would you suggest between Spanish (or perhaps Catalan!) and Turkish? The only two I can think of are 1) The roamings of the Gran Compañia Catalana de los Almogávares, see http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almog%C3%A1var, an article which doesn’t refer, though, to the main source about these adventurers and its publisher. -and 2) The Spanish Jews who settled (mainly) in Thessaloniki and Istanbul after their expulsion from Spain in 1492. Perhaps they brought along shoes to the Turks?! -which means it could be a Spanish loanword in Turkish and not vice versa! A search in the Turkish 22 volume dialect dictionary Derleme Sözlüğü may perhaps trigger some result...

    In general, we shouldn’t believe in everything that is written ;) – even if it emanates from the most prestigious dictionaries. No sources mentioned or no argument furnished is already a good reason for skepticism.

    Now, I really start wondering what might indeed be the etymology of the Spanish/Catalan/Portuguese word for shoe! :rolleyes:
    :) :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top