shook faintly

Zahraa Samy

Senior Member
Arabic
Hello, in would you help me understand " And it was while the shock of noon still shook faintly from the towers of Parliament" from this excerpt from the story The eye of Apollo,
"For three times in the day the new sun-worshipper went out on his little balcony, in the face of all Westminster, to say some litany to his shining lord: once at daybreak, once at sunset, and once at the shock of noon. And it was while the shock of noon still shook faintly from the towers of Parliament and parish church that Father Brown, the friend of Flambeau, first looked up and saw the white priest of Apollo."

I understood that he means that the strong sun of the noon, was beginning to appear slowly from the towers of the parliament. Is that accurate, or does it mean something else?

Appreciate your help.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The towers contain bells that strike at noon. The sound of the bells shakes the towers.
    Just after the bells had struck noon and the sound was still echoing in the bell towers, Father Brown looked up.
     

    Zahraa Samy

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    The towers contain bells that strike at noon. The sound of the bells shakes the towers.
    Just after the bells had struck noon and the sound was still echoing in the bell towers, Father Brown looked up.
    Thank you very much!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s clearly a reference to Big Ben — [the main bell in] the clock tower at the Palace of Westminster — marking noon by playing its usual 16-bong ‘quarters’ followed by 12 resounding chimes. But he also applies striking twelve to churches in general:

    … while the shock of noon still shook faintly from the towers of Parliament and parish church [alike]…
     
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