shoot a picture?

renetta

Senior Member
Italy, Italian
Hi everybody,

I came across the verb to shoot and I wonder whether it is used exclusively in the field of cinematography or also in that of photography. I know that one can take a picture, but can I say to shoot a picture?

thank you
 
  • banni

    Member
    Op
    You do can say 'shoot a picture', that's an action to describe the way you use camera to take picture. Not sure that i explain clearly :D
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    renetta said:
    Hi everybody,

    I came across the verb to shoot and I wonder whether it is used exclusively in the field of cinematography or also in that of photography. I know that one can take a picture, but can I say to shoot a picture?

    thank you
    Usually shooting a picture is reserved for cinematography.
    However, I have also heard it used for photography. More common is to take a picture.
    Will you shoot my picture with my family?:cross:
    Will you take my picture with my family?:tick:
    *I am going to take some pictures.:tick:
    I am going to shoot some pictures. :tick:
    We are shooting the video at the mall. :tick:
    We are taking the video at the mall. :tick:
    **We are taking the video to the mall. :tick:

    *The above sentence in red could be also understood as taking some already developed pictures with you somewhere.
    **You may only use to the mall if you are just taking a video tape with you. To take videos at the mall would mean you are shooting videos.

    You can also shoot a gun, which would have a different effect if pointed at a subject, then, say, shooting a video. :eek:

    You can also shoot off your mouth, which means to say things without thinking about what you are saying.

    Blanks are bullets you put in a gun that make noise, but nothing is fired out the end to hurt someone. "Shooting blanks" means making a lot of noise without really having anything weighty to say. It is a term that is also used to describe sexual activity of a man who has a low sperm count.

    I hope I have been helpful without giving you too much information (to confuse you!)

    Good luck.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    MJ is correct. However, there is a curious pattern with shoot and still photographs. We often refer to these as 'shots' or 'snapshots'. I imagine that at some earlier time, 'to shoot' was used more for photographs, and thus we have the shot/snapshot residue.

    It is also very common to say, "I'm going on a photo shoot."
     

    hsam

    Senior Member
    British English
    I've thought long and hard on this one...the verb shoot can mean:

    1) firing a shot from a gun He shot five bullets at the goose.
    2) score a goal (football probably) Beckham shot 3 goals before 1/2 time.
    3) to move quickly She shot up to the shop before it shut.
    4) to be marked or streaked Her dress was shot with gold.
    5) to kill someone with a gun The policeman shot the fugitive.
    6) to inject with a drug The doctor shot him with a lot of morphine.
    7) to photograph OR FILM Johnny Depp is shooting a new film in India.
    8) when a plant develops new growth The daffodil shoots some leaves
    9) to talk indiscreetly or wildly He was shooting his mouth off at the old lady
    10) to grow tall (often said by grannies to young relatives) My! You've shot up since I last saw you!

    Hope this helps
    holly
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    I can definitely shoot a picure.
    I can shoot one [a picture of you] over here.
    I can shoot one [a picture of you] over there by that car.

    I can also shoot one [a picture of you] over to you by email or by fax, which means not to take the picture, rather to send it electronically (or speedily, such as by messenger or FedEx).
     
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