Shoot vs. film

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jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
They are "shooing" or "filming" a TV show.


Are they both correct in AmE? If so, which one is more common? Thank you.
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    They are both used. Though film is pretty much gone from TV shows and partially gone from movie production, many of the terms originally used for film are still used. So "filming" is still fine, even when no film is involved.

    A few obsolete references that are still current terminology:

    In the can: means the film has been shot and is complete (and in the film can)
    Cut: an abrupt change in point of view, once made by actually cutting the film
    film clip: A short section of a film shown for advertising. It was literally a piece of film that was clipped from the reel.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    They are both used. Though film is pretty much gone from TV shows and partially gone from movie production, many of the terms originally used for film are still used. So "filming" is still fine, even when no film is involved.

    A few obsolete references that are still current terminology:

    In the can: means the film has been shot and is complete (and in the film can)
    Cut: an abrupt change in point of view, once made by actually cutting the film
    film clip: A short section of a film shown for advertising. It was literally a piece of film that was clipped from the reel.
    Thank you, Packard.
    In this case, if I ask "What TV show are you shooting or filming?", are they both correct ? Which one is more common in colloquial AmE?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    What TV show are you shooting?"
    What TV show are you filming?"

    Both are common in AE. Neither is more common. I would use "filming" because "shooting" has many other meanings.
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    I would use "shoot". Context makes it pretty unambiguous a word.

    In media production the event during which one films a television show or movie is often called "a shoot", so I think it sounds very natural. Also when referring back to the day one would say "That scene was shot on day 5", or "That scene was shot on location". I feel like it's more commonly used these days than "to film", in the industry.
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Hi,

    how about when I use these words with the meaning of making a film + a person:

    They were shooting/filming me.

    Both words are acceptable?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "They were shooting me." makes them sound like people with guns trying to kill you. It's not wrong in the correct context, but you wouldn't want to say just that sentence by itself.
    "They were shooting a TV show." does not.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In some contexts the difference between film and videotape is important. I would use shoot for that reason. If you don't know which technology is used, that covers both. But I have heard people in the business get peeved when someone refers to filming in a production that doesn't use film.

    In fact, in reference to TV series, calling it taping (accurately) is much more common, I think.

    - 'Match Game': What we saw during a live taping of the show

    - I Went To a Taping of 'The Masked Singer' & Here's What Went Down

    Now that I've remembered that, I think professionals only commonly use filming when film is involved.
     
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