shop / freelancer

< Previous | Next >

as_99

Senior Member
Arabic
IF I want to distinguish between an official competitor, who has a shop, office, official area, etc, to sit in and present his / her services and freelancer, who has no official place to sit in, what can I say?

Let's for example talk about the photophy industry, I would say about the official competitors "Studio" versus freelancer photographer, but I am not quite sure about this.

Please advise.
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Is this a contest? What do you mean by "competitor"? The opposite of "freelance" (which means self-employed) is "staff" or "employee"--not "competitor". Many freelancers have studios or offices. Perhaps if you give us some context about the situation and what thought(s) you want to express, we'll be better able to comment.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I would say about the official competitors "Studio" versus freelancer photographer, but I am not quite sure about this.
    In the particular case of photography, they can be called studio photographers and street photographers, respectively. Here are some Google Books examples:
    Street photographers usually congregate in small groups at more or less touristy sites and photograph primarily African tourists, who have the photos taken as proof that they were "there." (2003)

    These photographers were followed by first generations of independent itinerant photographers, who moved from village to village, of street photographers and studio photographers in urban areas. (2009)

    Park has come to be an imaginative supplement to migrant and refugee desire, and this has led to a clustering of street photographers alongside the taxis and hawkers. (2008)
    ~ Note that in some regions of the world you'd be hard pressed finding street photographers in the sense implied above. However, the term has a second sense: photographers who photograph people in public places for 'art's sake'; i.e. street photography is a particular genre of photography.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    In the particular case of photography, they can be called studio photographers and street photographers, respectively. [...]
    This does not apply in the US (we don't have photographers who conduct their business in the streets), nor does it respond to AS's original question, which dealt with freelancers and was not limited to photographers. We are still waiting for context and for an explanation of the part that "competitor" (mentioned in the original query) may play.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    This does not apply in the US (we don't have photographers who conduct their business in the streets)...
    I don't notice anything in the original post which qualifies the question to relate to the conditions prevalent in the U.S in particular.

    ...nor does it respond to AS's original question, which dealt with freelancers and was not limited to photographers.
    Quoting from the OP:
    "Let's for example talk about the photophy industry, I would say about the official competitors "Studio" versus freelancer photographer, but I am not quite sure about this."
    This is the context we often ask for in the forum before we answer a question, and I chose to reply to this specific part of the query.

    We are still waiting for context...
    I don't feel the original post needs more context; to me it is sufficiently clear as it stands. That it may not comprehensible to every other member should not, I think, stop those who feel they do understand from replying.

    ... and for an explanation of the part that "competitor" (mentioned in the original query) may play.
    One of the meanings of the word 'competition' is, according to AHD, "rivalry between two or more businesses striving for the same customer or market." And a competitor, here, is someone that competes with another in business. The word which the original poster is not clear about is 'freelance photographer'. My suggestion is that it should be 'street photographer'. And as has been pointed out, street photographers are not seen in all parts of the world.
     
    Last edited:

    as_99

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Folk,

    My point was about differentiation between the Studios, who have official physical office, shop, premises, place, etc, registered as a business and between those who practicing this profession without official obligations such as physical place, official name registered, etc.

    I hope you all get the point.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top