shortcut/cutoff/crossout

min300

Senior Member
Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
Hi everyone,

Talking about a rout shorter than the usual one, we can use ' shortcut' , 'cutoff', 'crosscut'( according to WR dictionary).
Which of them is more common in Am and Br English? Do use any slang to mean this?

Thanks
 
  • Prairiefire

    Senior Member
    US (Midwest) - English
    In the United States, it's a shortcut.

    Neither cutoff or crosscut would be used to refer to a route shorter than the usual one.
     

    estefanos

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi everyone,

    Talking about a rout shorter than the usual one, we can use ' shortcut' , 'cutoff', 'crosscut'( according to WR dictionary).
    Which of them is more common in Am and Br English? Do use any slang to mean this?

    Thanks

    Shortcut is the commonly used word.

    Where I live, in the Western US, a "cuttoff" road is a exactly shortcut road. The cuttoff roads are named for their desination or their two termini. For example, we have "Kootenai Cuttoff Road", which was originally a shortcut to Kootenai.

    Crosscut describes something that cuts or is cut across the grain, as in a saw or a piece of meat. I've never heard it used for a shortcut. A similar vierb form is common, though: "Lets cut across the field."
     

    min300

    Senior Member
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    Shortcut is the commonly used word.

    Where I live, in the Western US, a "cuttoff" road is a exactly shortcut road. The cuttoff roads are named for their desination or their two termini. For example, we have "Kootenai Cuttoff Road", which was originally a shortcut to Kootenai.

    Crosscut describes something that cuts or is cut across the grain, as in a saw or a piece of meat. I've never heard it used for a shortcut. A similar vierb form is common, though: "Lets cut across the field."

    Thank you very much for your clear explanation.
     

    Prairiefire

    Senior Member
    US (Midwest) - English
    Well, now I've learned something, too! "Cutoff" must be a regional term from the northwestern US (Idaho? Washington?); I've never heard it before.

    I have heard the term 'take the cutoff,' but only in reference to a smaller road coming off a larger road. The 'cutoff' that I know is not necessarily a shortcut or even heading to the same destination as the larger road.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Well, now I've learned something, too! "Cutoff" must be a regional term from the northwestern US (Idaho? Washington?); I've never heard it before.

    I have heard the term 'take the cutoff,' but only in reference to a smaller road coming off a larger road. The 'cutoff' that I know is not necessarily a shortcut or even heading to the same destination as the larger road.

    I don't think it's a regionalism. It appears in more than one dictionary entry:


    American Heritage Dictionary

    2. A shortcut or bypass

    Merriam-Webster Online

    2 a : the new and relatively short channel formed when a stream cuts through the neck of an oxbow b : SHORTCUT 1 c : a channel made to straighten a stream
     
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