Shortcut

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
I have been thinking of shortcuts while discussing the easy/difficult topic. What would be your word for that? Do you "cut" something too?

(By the way: we did discuss elephant paths (and shortcuts) elsewhere, but the focus got blurred though the digressions (= detours) about various "trodden paths" and others were very interesting.)

In Dutch it would simply be
- binnenweg (inside way, because one uses the inside of the straight angle, I guess)
- afsnijding (a cut-off), but uncommon.
- kortere weg (short way)
AND in some cases olifantenpad or path of desire, but that is special. Let's not take that detour this time.
 
  • ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    From the other thread we can take along:
    - In French, raccourci ("shortening"...)
    - in Sardinian truncare in curtzu (to break in short)
    - in Greek «Κόβω δρόμο» [ˈkovo ˈðromo] --> to cut (a/the) road

    I think there will be more. But let us avoid digressions...
     
    From the other thread we can take along:
    ....
    - in Greek «Κόβω δρόμο» [ˈkovo ˈðromo] --> to cut (a/the) road

    ...
    That's the periphrastic verbal expression, the noun is «συντόμευση» [sinˈdɔ.me.fsi] (fem.), a modern construction (1890) in the form of the 3rd declension Katharevousa Greek noun «συντόμευσις» [sinˈdɔ.me.fsis] (fem. nom. sing.), «συντομεύσεως» [sin.dɔˈme.fse.ɔs] (fem. gen. sing.) --> shortcut < Classical adjective «σύντομος» súntŏmŏs --> cut short, abridged, concise, brief < compound: Classical prefix & preposition «σύν» sún + Classical feminine deverbative noun «τομή» tŏmḗ --> intersection, o-grade of verb «τέμνω» témnō
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Catalan: drecera (from dreçar "to set straight", related to adreçar "to address", endreçar "to tidy up", from Vulgar Latin directiare so related to directe, to dret "right, straight, upright" and so on)
    Spanish: atajo (from atajar "to take a short cut", also "to put an end to", like atajar un problema, from tajar "to cut", secondary synonym of cortar)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Conceptually interesting: the shortcut is often the straight line indeed (just like the elephant path in the other thread), whereas the de-tour is often a tour around (see the other thread). So far we have the aspects of being (a) shorter and also (b) straighter, (and c?) more direct, I think.

    @Apmoy: also like "contraction" then (like muscle contraction or cramp)? But I am astonished as for "intersection". I mean: from short to cross-roads? But maybe there is some misundertanding...
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, when we were children, we had an expression during games: "couper le fromage" (lit. to cut the cheese), which meant to cheat by taking a shortcut.
    The expression comes from games where players form a circle (resembling a round cheese), and someone has to run around the circle. If he cheats by cutting through the circle as a shortcut, he's supposed to couper le fromage. It seems this expression is still in use today amoung children.

    EDIT: I've just discovered that the English expression "to cut the cheese" has a totally different idiomatic slang meaning :eek:
     
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    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Finnish
    Swedish:
    Ta kortaste vägen - take the shortest way
    Ta en genväg/ginväg - take a shortcut (gen/gin - old word for straight, comfortable)
    Att gena - ta en genväg; han genade över gräsmattan - he took a shortcut across the grass
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Aragonese: alcorce (also written alcorze) --From the verb alcorzar 'to trim, to cut off, to take a shortcut', from a Latin form *adcurtiare, prefix ad- + curt-iare (from curtus 'short').
     
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