Shortlisted/nominated/appointed for the prize?

sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!:)

Jane has been shortlisted/nominated/appointed for the school prize.

Can I use them interchangeably in this case? Is there a difference among them?

Thanks,

Sam:cool:
 
  • Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    Not really. Appointed means that Jane will definitely get the prize. Nominated means that she is one of two or more who will be considered for the prize. This suggests a nominator. Shortlisted means that there has been a process of elimination, but Jane is still being considered. For example, "Eight people have been nominated, and Jane is one of three who have been shortlisted." I hope that's clear. Someone else may be able to explain it better.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    If I'm being considered for an award or a job, I'd rather be "shortlisted" than "nominated." The former suggests that I am viewed favorably. Of course, there could be three people in the list of nominees in one context but five people in the "shortlist" in a different context.

    Another difference is that a nomination is often formally recognized, while being shortlisted is usually unofficial.
     

    una madre

    Senior Member
    Western Canada English
    These words are definitely not interchangeable. They do not have a shared meaning.

    Other people nominate you (put your name forward) to receive a prize or award that is available. From the list of nominated people, the judges prepare a 'short list'. if you are 'shortlisted' you might still win the prize or award. Yes, even if you don't end up winning it is a better honour to be shortlisted than just nominated - you got nearer the prize.

    One cannot be appointed to win a prize. You can be appointed to a position or to a job or to perform a function. There is no competition involved in this case.

    Hope this helps.
     

    una madre

    Senior Member
    Western Canada English
    I don't agree with bibliolept's statement that "being shortlisted is usually unofficial."

    If there is a high-profile award: for example, a writing award - the "shortlist" is often a very public, long-awaited, official list.

    Even if it is a private shortlist (i.e. for a job or position) it is still an official list (just not in the public domain).
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I suppose it depends on what you mean by "official." Unless I see a press release or official website with the phrase "shortlisted" (or a close variant), I might not call it "official." Again, it depends on the situation.
     
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