should she win her party's nomination

lapot

Senior Member
Hello. I've come across the following sentence in the TV. Actually, in a series where a reporter is talking about the presidential champagne.

'And rumors coming out of Vice President's camp detail a preliminary short list of running mates should she, as expected, win her party's nomination.'

I see it a little weird so, I've got two questions.

1) is this sentence the same that? :
'And rumors coming out of Vice President's camp detail a preliminary short list of running mates if she, as expected, win her party's nomination.'

2) Why is it said 'should she'. Is it a matter of emphasis? I mean, Could be possible to say: "...she should, as expected..." switching the words.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    1) is this sentence the same that? :
    'And rumors coming out of Vice President's camp detail a preliminary short list of running mates if she, as expected, win her party's nomination.'
    "If she were to win...." is equivalent to "should she."

    2) Why is it said 'should she'. Is it a matter of emphasis? I mean, Could be possible to say: "...she should, as expected..." switching the words.

    The inversion (should she) here expresses the fact that the verb is in the conditional. Perhaps someone can come up with a "rule" for this.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's the same as 'if she wins . . .', with a inflected verb. There's no real difference in meaning; 'should' is a little more formal. It can't be 'she should': it's the inversion that makes it conditional (equivalent to 'if'):

    if she wins [inflected 'wins']
    if she should win [modal 'should' followed by plain form 'win']
    should she win [conditional inversion, no 'if']

    There must be many previous threads about 'should' and 'if'.
     
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