show off

Zeidan

Senior Member
Arabic
Hi dear friends,

can I use the phrase show off as a noun, like for example if I say: " stop boasting you show off" ?

If yes, please can anyone tell more informal words with the same meaning.

Thanks very much in advance.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi dear friends,

    can I use the phrase show off as a noun, like for example if I say: " stop boasting you show off" ?

    If yes, please can anyone tell more informal words with the same meaning.

    Thanks very much in advance.
    Yes, children, especially, use it this way all the time ie: "Who cares if you can ride a bike with no hands - you're such a show-off!"

    I'm not sure of other idioms for "show-off". Many people would say "braggart" or "know-it-all" but one is called a "show-off" because of something they do. Accordingly, I'm not sure your sentence is exactly correct - just because someone is boasting does not mean that they are showing off. It depends on context.
     

    Tabac

    Senior Member
    U. S. - English
    Yes, children, especially, use it this way all the time ie: "Who cares if you can ride a bike with no hands - you're such a show-off!"

    I'm not sure of other idioms for "show-off". Many people would say "braggart" or "know-it-all" but one is called a "show-off" because of something they do. Accordingly, I'm not sure your sentence is exactly correct - just because someone is boasting does not mean that they are showing off. It depends on context.
    I agree with what you're hinting at. We are braggarts if we talk about our talents, we are show-offs when we actually perform.
     

    JSand4325

    Member
    U.S. (English)
    Just to point out, braggarts is not used in AE. We would understand the word, but it sounds odd to us. Show off on the other hand can definitely be used as a noun in AE.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Just to point out, braggarts is not used in AE. We would understand the word, but it sounds odd to us. Show off on the other hand can definitely be used as a noun in AE.
    The position is not much different in the UK, I would say. Show off: very common. Braggart? Well, it's not a word often heard. It sounds like something out of a costume drama, to me.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Show-off should be written with a hyphen when it's a noun.

    Is that a rule?

    The other day someone wrote that you should use a hyphen when the words join to become an adjective.

    I don't recall having any rules on this matter when I was in school. Of course when I was in school we still had to put two dots over the second "o" of "cooperate".
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yes, I would say that it's a rule. Use a hyphen when you combine two or more words to create one noun expressing one concept with no modifiers.

    1. movie theater (no hyphen because theater is a noun and movie is a modifier)
    but
    2. know-it-all (hyphen because the combination of words constitutes a single noun with no modifiers)

    I should note that some might use a hyphen in 1 (and I believe there are British-American differences in this area), but my point is that a hyphen is required in 2.
     
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