show up to picket

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Milad333

Senior Member
Armenian
Hello

I was wondering if the colored words mean "to arrive at the bar/fence/railing" or "to arrive and begin their protest"?

"At a gala hosted by the Defense Department, where the prime minister was to receive a
humanitarian award, more than a thousand people showed up to
picket
."
 
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    The people came to protest, to act like a picket fence.
    To surround the speaker as much as possible as a fence against his words or actions in his post.
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    If the verb "picket" ever evoked the image of a picket fence, it doesn't anymore except perhaps for a few people who know its derivation. "To picket" means to march or stand while holding signs called "picket signs", lined up with other picketers.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It says they showed up to join the protest. It doesn't say they joined the protest, but you have to assume they did. Otherwise, they would not have come.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm not familiar with this use of "picket". In the UK "picket" usually has a more specific sense: to stand outside a place of work while a strike is going on, trying to persuade others to strike and not to go in to work.
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    I'm not familiar with this use of "picket". In the UK "picket" usually has a more specific sense: to stand outside a place of work while a strike is going on, trying to persuade others to strike and not to go in to work.
    In American English it means either that or to mount a protest in a similar form. For example, you will nearly always see at least a few people in front of the White House in Washington holding picket signs.
     
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