Showing respect with writing "You" instead of "you"

< Previous | Next >

slowik

Senior Member
Polish
If I am writing a paper at the request of my teacher and I want to address her in it, should I write "You" or "you"? I just want to show the student's respect towards the teacher. In Poland it would be appropriate to start such words with a capital letter. What's it like in English-speaking countries?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    We do not capitalize the second-person personal pronoun in English, unless it begins a sentence or some other such special circumstance.

    Generally speaking, capitalization in English follows grammatical rules rather than indulging in what colloquially is called "sucking up" to somebody.
     

    iskndarbey

    Senior Member
    US, English
    No English speaker would have any idea what you were trying to get at if you insisted in capitalizing 'you'. Happily, in my opinion, all gradations of politeness in personal pronouns in standard English disappeared many decades ago.
     
    This is local grammar influence to always use capital to show respect in any direct conversation. More than it, to give more respect we here call the name of the person to avoid using 'you'. I doubt if English has the rule as such.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The only time I see personal pronouns capitalized is when someone is referring to the Diety of their religion. Your teacher might find being compared to God either over-the-top or offensive.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is local grammar influence to always use capital to show respect in any direct conversation. More than it, to give more respect we here call the name of the person to avoid using 'you'. I doubt if English has the rule as such.
    You're not going to see capitals in conversation, of course, but I know what you mean. My wife is from Malaysia and I remember the first time I referred to her, politely, as she in conversation with her and someone else. We don't do that anymore. :)
     
    You're not going to see capitals in conversation, of course, but I know what you mean. My wife is from Malaysia and I remember the first time I referred to her, politely, as she in conversation with her and someone else. We don't do that anymore. :)
    I mean direct conversation involving two or more persons like in email exchange, or forum, using our language, we should use capital when it happens we write You or someone's name whom we are speaking to.

    Your wife might forget the culture :)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I mean direct conversation involving two or more persons like in email exchange, or forum, using our language, we should use capital when it happens we write You or someone's name whom we are speaking to.
    Thanks for the clarification.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top