shrimp (a small person in colloquial language)

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning Ladies & Gentlemen, what do you call a small person in your language? Colloquial, slang, obscene words are welcome. Thanks for your cooperation and have a productive day. Encolpius.

Hungarian: tögmag [pumpkin seed] colloquial, seggdugasz [arse cork/stopper] vulgar
 
  • TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Italian.

    I can only think of two words. Hopefully other Italians will chime in.

    Tappo (and its diminutive form: tappetto); colloquial, mildly to non-offensive = cork, cap (of a bottle)
    Nano (and its diminutive forms: nanetto, nanerottolo); colloquial, fairly offensive = dwarf, midget
     
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    Greek:

    -«Τάπα» [ˈta.pa] (fem.) --> cap (of a bottle) < It. tappo. For very short persons. Slang. Offensive.

    -«Στούμπος» [stum.bɔs] (masc.) --> squab, titch, peewee < Late Byzantine Gr. masc. noun «στού(μ)πης» stoú(m)pis --> pestle < South Slavic стѫпа (stǫpa), mortar (i.e. mortar & pestle). Colloquialism. Offensive.

    -«Ζουμπάς» [zumˈbas] (masc.) --> squab, titch, peewee < Tur. zımba (zɰmba) --> stapler, punch. Colloquialism (somewhat dated). Offensive.

    -«Koντοπίθαρος, -ρη, -ρο» [kɔn.dɔˈpi.θa.ɾɔs] (masc.), [kɔn.dɔˈpi.θa.ɾi] (fem.), [kɔn.dɔˈpi.θa.ɾɔ] (neut.) --> titch, squab < MoGr adj. «κοντός» [kɔnˈdɔs] --> short, of small stature, (flag)pole < Classical deverbative adj. «κοντός» kŏntós --> short < Classical v. «κεντέω/κεντῶ» kĕntéō (uncontracted)/kĕntô (contracted) --> to sting, goad (PIE *ḱent- to sting cf Alb. çandër, pole); the meaning of short for «κοντός» which had as primary meanings pole, crutch, staff arose by reanalysis of the compounds with first element the combinatory «κοντο-» where it was taken as short) + MoGr neut. noun «πιθάρι» [piˈθa.ɾi] --> large or small jar or pot made of clay for containing oil or wine < Byzantine Gr. neut. diminutive «πιθάρι(ο)ν» pithári(o)n (idem) < Classical masc. noun «πίθος» pítʰŏs --> large, mostly earthen vessel for storing wine, which is open at the top (of unknown etymology, most likely Pre-Greek). «Κοντοπίθαρος» is literally the very short person, as short as a small jar. Colloquialism. Neutral.

    -«Κοντορεβιθούλης, -λα, -λικο» [kɔn.dɔ.ɾe.viˈθu.lis] (masc.), [kɔn.dɔ.ɾe.viˈθu.la] (fem.), [kɔn.dɔ.ɾe.viˈθu.li.kɔ] (neut.) --> Tom Thumb, Le petit Poucet, Der kleine Däumling; the character of Charles Perrault's fairytale which was translated into Greek as «κοντορεβιθούλης»=short-chickpea < MoGr adj. «κοντός» [kɔnˈdɔs] (see above) + MoGr neut. noun «ρεβίθι» [ɾeˈvi.θi] --> chickpea < Byz. Gr. neut. diminutive «ῥεβίθι(ο)ν» rhebíthi(o)n (idem) < Classical masc. noun «ἐρέβινθος» ĕrébĭntʰŏs --> chickpea (of unknown etymology, possibly a Mediterranean Wanderwort cf Lat. ervum > It. ervo, Sp. yero; Proto-Germanic *arwīts > Ger. Erbse, Dt. erwt) + ΜοGr masc. diminutive suffix «-ούλης» [-ˈu.lis]. Cute, but also dated.

    -«Κοντοστούπης, -πα, -πικο» [kɔn.dɔˈstu.pis] (masc.), [kɔn.dɔˈstu.pa] (fem.), [kɔn.dɔˈstu.pi.kɔ] (neut.) --> shorty, titch < MoGr adj. «κοντός» [kɔnˈdɔs] (see earlier) + Late Byzantine Gr. masc. noun «στού(μ)πης» stoú(m)pis --> pestle < South Slavic стѫпа (see earlier). Colloquialism. Mildy offensive.

    -«Νάνος» [ˈna.nɔs] (masc. & fem.) --> dwarf, individuals who have the condition of dwarfism < Classical noun «νᾶνος» nânŏs and «νάννος» nắnnŏs --> dwarf (of unknown etymoloɡy. The Latin nānus is a Greek loan). The condition of dwarfism is «νανισμός» [na.niˈzmɔs] (masc.) in Greek. Neutral.

    Edit: Added «νάνος»
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    In Catalan, three come to my mind:

    tap de bassa [literally, 'pool plug'] - common, at least in Catalonia​
    napbuf [maybe from ratbuf 'water rat', with influence of nap 'turnip'] - It's used in literature rather than in common speech​
    patufet [little tiny boy; maybe related to barrufet "little imp; smurf"] - Well-known because of the Patufet character being common in Catalan traditional folk stories, with a song begging not to be stepped on​
     

    Nanon

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    I'm not a native, as you can see, but I think in French it's "demi-portion", or maybe "nabot" (dwarf); FR speakers will confirm (or perhaps not :) ).
    Confirmed ;). Those terms are offensive.
    Bouchon (cork) is a term of endearment and crevette (shrimp) is also an affectionate term for a baby. Nothing to do with small persons except that a baby is small.
     

    franknagy

    Senior Member
    Good morning Ladies & Gentlemen, what do you call a small person in your language? Colloquial, slang, obscene words are welcome. Thanks for your cooperation and have a productive day. Encolpius.

    Hungarian: tögmag [pumpkin seed] colloquial, seggdugasz [arse cork/stopper] vulgar
    Typo: correct is töKmag.
    Other solutions:
    • kis mitugrász [small why are you jumping]
    • kettéfűrészelt óriás [giant sawed into two pieces]
     
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