Shut up! Get out! - too good to be true

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Messquito

Senior Member
Chinese - Taiwan 中文 Taiwanese Hokkien 臺語
In America, at least from what I observe when talking to my American friends and on the TVs, when they hear some wonderful/unbelievable news and is very excited/surprised, they might respond with "Shut up!" or "Get out!" (I even came upon "Shut your face!" in a show but that's just once.)
Saying these, they are expressing their surprise at the news through negative words or, to be exact, words showing disbelief.
Also, a milder expression would be "You don't say?"

I've observed the same thing in Chinese and Japanese:

In Taiwan:
幹!真的? Fuck, really?
屁啦!真的? Fart! Really? (屁 is a slang for bullshit/nonsense)
真的假的? Real or not?

The case I observed in Japanese is extremely similar to the English "Shut up.":
うそ [uso]=a lie/a falsehood-->You are telling a lie!-->That's too good to be true!
The kanji for it is 嘘, which is a cognate with 噓 in Chinese, the latter used in Chinese to mean "Hush! Be quiet!"

Does this happens in your language, too? Please share with us!
 
  • ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    In this context, "Get out!" or "Get out of/outta here!" for "You('ve) got to/gotta be kidding!", "(Are you) for real?", or "No way!" are common. "Shut up/Shut your face!", "Shut the front door!", and "(That sounds) too good to be true." wouldn't be used with this meaning.
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Saying these, they are expressing their surprise at the news through negative words or, to be exact, words showing disbelief.
    Czech:

    hovno (shit)
    prdlajs (from prd - fart)
    fakt, jo? (really, yes?)
    nekecej (don't talk/lie)
     

    SuperXW

    Senior Member
    In this context, "Get out!" or "Get out of/outta here!" for "You('ve) got to/gotta be kidding!", "(Are you) for real?", or "No way!" are common. "Shut up/Shut your face!", "Shut the front door!", and "(That sounds) too good to be true." wouldn't be used with this meaning.
    What's the difference? Could you give some examples?
     
    Greek:

    «Άντε ρε!» [ˈade ɾe] --> Come on, you! (colloquialism) < MoGr interjection «άντε» [ˈade] < Tur. interj. hadi, come on, let's go + MoGr interjection «ρε» [ɾe] --> colloquial you < Late ByzGr «ὠρέ» ōré < Classical vocative «μωρέ» mōré (used as interjection in Classical times already) of nominal «μωρός» mōrós --> stupid, obtuse, foolish (with unexplained etymology).
    Also,
    «Άντε ρε από 'δω» [ˈade ɾe ˌapo͜ ˈðo] --> Get out of here!
     

    ger4

    Senior Member
    German
    German:

    Erzähl keinen Scheiß! 'Don't talk shit!'
    Ohne Scheiß? 'Without shit?'
    Hör auf! 'Stop it!'
    Nee, ne? ~ 'No, not?'

    I guess the list can be expanded. The last one, '
    nee, ne?' is typical for Northern Germany (ne works as some kind of a universal question tag, sometimes even if no actual question is involved - a 'reaffirmation-tag' perhaps...)
     

    123xyz

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian:

    абе - an interjection with over five meanings, including the one that the OP is asking about, but only if said with the proper intonation (different intonation patterns differentiate its multiple meanings)
    ме зезаш - you're joking with me
    не! - no! (said with a specific intonation)
    уј - another interjection, but a crude one, usually indicating less surprise than the first one; it's not used by many people (I know only a few who use it)

    These are used when the speaker is shocked, but still believes his collocutor - he just thinks that what he's hearing is extraordinary. If, however, there is genuine disbelief, i.e. the speaker thinks his collocutor is lying, a completely different set of phrases/interjections would be used (that's where vulgar words would actually come in), but as far as I gather, this is not what the OP was asking about.
     

    Ectab

    Senior Member
    Arabic-Iraq
    In Arabic, I don't think such words exist..
    but we say in MSA and some dialects:
    MSA: qul ghayra-haa قل غيرها
    Iraqi dialect: guul gher-ha
    Means literraly: Say\tell other than it
    to express that you don't believe what the other person is saying so that you tell them to say another thing that could be believable for you.
     

    Kotlas

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    In Russian, we have similar phrases to express disbelief and/or to show surprise:
    Прекрати! or Перестань! (Stop it!)
    Иди ты! (similar to: Get out!; to be precise, the verb 'go' is used.)

    In Italian, the verb "go" is also used to show disbelief in the phrase: Ma va' là! (Get out of here!) .
     
    Last edited:

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Dutch:
    Schei uit! (Stop it!)
    Ga weg! (Go away!)
    Nee! (No!)

    Nee doesn't mean you don't want to believe it. It just means you're surprised!
     

    kloie

    Senior Member
    English
    get outta here.
    you don't say.
    correct me if I'm wrong,but these are all used in the USA,I don't know if they are used in the UK.
     
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