Shutter types

Linnets

Senior Member
Do you have shutters at home? Apart from house style, I think they're connected to climate: they are easily found in sunny, warmer zones where the sun rays may disturb people inside or damage the wood of the windows. Here is a small glossary of types in English and Italian:

English​
Italian​
window shutter​
imposta [imˈpɔsta]​
paneled shutter​
antone [anˈtoːne], scuro [ˈskuːro]​
louvered shutter​
persiana [perˈsjaːna]​
roller shutter​
avvolgibile [avvolˈdʒiːbile], tapparella [tappaˈrɛlla]​
interior shutter​
scuretto [skuˈretto]​
 
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  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In Russian:
    solid paneled shutters (most typically, but not necessarily, exterior) - pl. stávni (from stávit' - to set, to make stand), a traditional element of a Russian peasant house;
    roller shutter - (pl. only) rol'stávni (a partial loan from Germ. Rollladen?);
    shutters with any type of louvers - (pl. only) zhalyuzí (or zhályuzi - incorrect, but very frequent in everyday language), from Fr. jalousie, a calque from Italian gelosia.
     
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    In Greece the most common type of window shutter is the Venetian blind, named «παντζούρι, -ρια» [panˈd͡z̠uɾi] (neut. nom. simg.), [panˈd͡z̠uɾʲa] (neut. nom. pl.) < Fr. abat-jour via Ottoman Tur. panjur. Nowadays it's the generic name for any shutter.

    Katharevousa Gr. tried to impose «παραθυρόφυλλο, -λλα» [paɾaθiˈɾo̞filo̞] (neut. nom. sing.), [paɾaθiˈɾo̞fila] (neut. nom. pl.) as a replacement for the foreign word, but it proved unsuccessful; sometimes however, the paneled shutter is referred to as «παραθυρόφυλλο»; it's a compound = MoGr «παράθυρο» [paˈɾaθiɾo̞] (neut.) --> window < Βyz. Gr. «παράθυρον» paráthyron (neut.) < Koine Gr. «παράθυρος» pắrắtʰŭrŏs (fem.) --> side-door, wicket (< prefix & preposition «παρά» părắ + Classical fem. noun «θύρα» tʰúrā) + Classical neuter noun «φύλλον» pʰúllŏn.

    Roller shutter is in plural «ρολά» [ɾo̞ˈla] (neut. nom. pl.) < Fr. rouleau, and describes mostly the front roller shutter that secures shops. Older apartments often have rollers instead of blinds or panels.

    Interior shutter is «περσίδες» [pe̞rˈs̠iðe̞s̠] (fem. nom. pl.) or «γρίλιες» [ˈɣriʎe̞s̠] (fem. nom. pl.).
    The former is calqued for the Fr. persienne and prevails by far over the latter, which comes from the Italian griglia.
     
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    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    As you have alluded to in your original post, we Brits live on an (usually!*) cool, wet island that makes rare usage of shutters. However, we do make use of things like 'blinds' and it would be interesting to know the origin of the English term and whether Italians refer to "Venetian (< from Venice/Venetia) Blinds" with the same eponym. I see apmoy70 alludes to this, but I don't see this as a real 'shutter' in English - rather a shutter is more a French-type 'volet' for me. I can stand corrected. (Of course, in both cases the shutter/blind 'shuts out' the (sun)light ...)

    (*I say "usually" but at the moment we're in the middle of a heatwave with temperatures in the high 20's/80's ...)

    A 'caead' (a lid) or a 'clawr' (a cover, like a book cover) is what we have for 'a shutter' in Cymraeg/Welsh in this context. (And for the foregoing, 'caead Fenis' - no <v> in the Welsh alphabet.)
     

    Kaoss

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    Spanish:

    If it has hinges and and is on the ouside: Contraventana.
    Any some kind of rolling shutter: Persiana.
    Fixed ones: celosías (lattice?)
     

    farscape

    mod-errare humanum est
    Romanian
    In Romanian we have:

    (for blinds, on the inside of the window) - stor (pl. storuri)
    shutters - oblong (pl. obloane)
    rolling shutters - jaluzea (pl. jaluzele)
    fixed shutters - Persiană
     

    Linnets

    Senior Member
    shutters with any type of louvers - (pl. only) zhalyuzí (or zhályuzi - incorrect, but very frequent in everyday language), from Fr. jalousie, a calque from Italian gelosia.
    In Italian gelosia [dʒeloˈsiːa, -ˈziː-] may indicate a persiana (louvered shutter) but also other types of shutters that allow vision form the inside without being seen from the outside. It may indicate also the small opening of a persiana, also called persianina ('little persiana', [persjaˈniːna]).

    If it has hinges and and is on the ouside: Contraventana.
    Any some kind of rolling shutter: Persiana.
    In Italian controfinestra [kontrofiˈnɛstra] (literally 'contraventana') means an additional window in the external part, like this one, to protect form cold and noises.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:

    window shutter:
    persiana [pərsi'anə] (< calque from French persienne, feminine of persien 'Persian')​
    paneled shutter:
    finestró [finəs'tro] (literally, 'little window' < finestra 'window' < Latin)​
    porticó [purti'ko] (literally, 'little door' < porta 'door' < Latin)​
    ventalló [bəntə'ʎo] (literally, 'little lattice' < ventalla 'lattice' < see below)​
    louvered shutter:
    persiana de llibret
    persiana mallorquina (literally, 'Majorcan blind') <- they are outdoor framed louvered shutters.​

    outdoor roller shutter:
    persiana valenciana (literally, 'Valencian blind')​
    interior shutter:
    persiana veneciana (literally, 'Venetian blind')​

    lattice:
    gelosia [ʒəlu'ziə] (< gelós 'jealous' + -ia, noun suffix, but maybe taken from Italian)​
    ventalla [bənta'ʎə] (< ventall 'fan' < vent·ar 'to fan' + -all, suffix for tools < Latin ventus 'wind')​
     

    Kaoss

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    In Italian controfinestra [kontrofiˈnɛstra] (literally 'contraventana') means an additional window in the external part, like this one, to protect form cold and noises.
    We would call that a "doble ventana", which is not the same a window with "cristal doble", when you have a two part glass with an isolation chamber in between.
     
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