Si chiama Pietro torna indietro

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Dear WRers!

Context:

A friend of mine needs some dictionaries and I am willing to lend my books to him. Since my materials are very important to me, I want to make sure he will return them to me. In Italian, I would say this book SI CHIAMA PIETRO (TORNA INDIETRO).

How do you say in English SI CHIAMA PIETRO TORNA INDIETRO.

xxx Maybe in English is IT IS A RETURN BOOK (like the tickets?)? ^_^ Or IT IS A BORROW AND RETURN BOOK.

Do you have in English any funny way of saying for this?

Thanks

Alice
 
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  • Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi cicemeni,

    I've never heard of a way to express anything like that in English sorry.
    Any attempt to even try to think of something wouldn't be something that sounded normal.

    In Italian is it always Pietro?
     

    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Alex, it's because of the rhyme Pietro/indietro ;)

    Finding a rhyming equivalent in English would be a colossal fluke. Or we can invent one....:p (this book's name is Jack, you've got to bring it back)
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Yes, because it rhymes with indietro.

    I don't know an English expression either. You could say "Its name's Jack and I want it back!", but I don't think it would be appreciated.:D
    :eek: (happens to me all the time as well).
    And you two seem to be well in tune with each other, good rhyme, but if someone gave me a pen or a book and told me it was called Jack and he wanted it back, I probably wouldn't even take it any more.... :)cool:)
     
    WOW!!! Jack-back sounds great, but of course, that's not a real English expression.

    I didn't want somenthing like in Italian (with rythm), but something you use as they do in Spain (ida y vuelta - which means go and back or return ticket).

    No problem, it looks like in English you don't have an expression for this. OK, I will do without it.

    Thanks!!!

    Cice
     

    Tonza

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree with all of the above comments, that to actually say this in English, even in a funny way, would not be appreciated. On a practical level, though, there is a polite way to do this. People often label their books with a little sticker (one that they have had professionally printed or have printed themselves) that says: "From the library of Cicemeni". In a much funnier version, the sticker says: "Stolen from the library of Cicemeni". :)
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Yes, I've often used the "Stolen from..." version on books and other objects. It's probably as effective as the Pietro saying, in other words not very!
     

    furs

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I used the expression 'it's called Jack' many times with American friends, in a joking manner. When they heard it, they would always give me a puzzled look, then, after a smile, a clear gesture, and the next line '... jack, come back!') they invariably got immediately what I meant.
     

    GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    I like it: can I experiment with an embellishment?

    A) "Oh, and remember Jack."
    B) "Jack? (Who's Jack?)"
    A) "He/Jack wants it back!" / "It belongs to Jack and he wants it back!"

    Hmm, OK maybe it doesn't roll of the tongue like Pietro....
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Hi gigi - I've never heard such an expression in English, but it's a nice idea!
    I guess you could say, "Its name is Jack, make sure it comes back!" or "His name is Jack, make sure he comes back!"
    (your sentence is missing a subject - it would have to be "he will come back" but I don't think it makes sense like this.)
     

    xmas50

    Senior Member
    USA
    Italian - Italy
    Hi
    I have this sentence:
    --Sabato parto per una vacanza di immersioni subacquee. Mi presteresti il tuo orologio da sub? -- Sì, te lo do ma si chiama Pietro...
    --On Saturday I'm leaving on a scuba vacation. Could I borrow your scuba watch? -- Sure, I'll give it to you, but it has my name on it

    What do you think, could "it has my name on it" work? Does it convey the message? Is it kind enough (meaning not offensive)?
    On the other hand, "I want it back" doesn't sound more stylish or less disagreeable.
    I have to say that I love the Jack/back rhyme, but according to the posts nobody will get it. Sooooo... can you help, please?
    Thank you
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Hi
    I have this sentence:
    --Sabato parto per una vacanza di immersioni subacquee. Mi presteresti il tuo orologio da sub? -- Sì, te lo do ma si chiama Pietro...
    --On Saturday I'm leaving on a scuba vacation. Could I borrow your scuba watch? -- Sure, I'll give it to you, but it has my name on it

    What do you think, could "it has my name on it" work? Does it convey the message? Is it kind enough (meaning not offensive)?
    On the other hand, "I want it back" doesn't sound more stylish or less disagreeable.
    I have to say that I love the Jack/back rhyme, but according to the posts nobody will get it. Sooooo... can you help, please?
    Thank you
    It's name is Jack and I want it back! is perfectly understandable. There was only one poster who said it took a few American he used it with to look puzzled, but only because he said It's called Jack (you need to use the complete phrase).

    It has my name on it also works for me. :)
     

    La Pieri Aliena

    New Member
    Italiano
    My english teacher used to say, for any borrowed stuff from her : "It's called Jack, come back"!, so I think this expression is the right one :D
     
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