"Si elle" and "S'il"

Honki

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi.

I am a beginner of French. So the questions in this thread will be very low-level ones.


Please look at sentences (1)-(8) below.
I hear sentences (1)-(4) are grammatically and semantically correct, but sentences (5)-(8) are not natural expressions.
Sentences (5)-(8) are only the exchange of “elle” in sentences (1)-(4) for “il”.
Furthermore, I hear sentences (5’)-(8’) are natural as French expressions.

(1) Si elle est un homme, elle est mortel.
(2) Si elle est italien, elle est européen.
(3) Si elle est mort, elle était un être humain.
(4) Si elle est à Paris maintenant, elle est en France.

(5) Si il est un homme, il est mortel.
(6) Si il est italien, il est européen.
(7) Si il est mort, il était un être humain.
(8) Si il est à Paris maintenant, il est en France.

(5’) S'il est un homme, il est mortel.
(6’) S'il est italien, il est européen.
(7’) S'il est mort, il était un être humain.
(8’) S'il est à Paris maintenant, il est en France.

Question:
Are such sentences as (5)-(8) grammatical errors?
Do sentences (5)-(8) have problems as French?

Thank you in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • Honki

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hello,
    1-2-3 are not correct (see gender agreement).
    Thank you for pointing out my mistakes.
    Sorry.
    I will correct.

    (1) Si elle est un homme, elle est mortel.
    → Si elle est un être humain, elle est mortelle.
    (2) Si elle est italien, elle est européen.
    → Si elle est italienne, elle est européenne. 〈sorry〉
    (3) Si elle est mort, elle était un être humain.
    → Si elle est morte, elle était un être humain.
     
    Last edited:

    Swatters

    Senior Member
    French - Belgium, some Wallo-Picard
    The apparent elision of si+il is diachronically a preservation of an older form of si: se. Like other small words ending with schwa, it elided before vowels, but starting from the 16th century, se began to fall out of use in favour of si, with the combination se+il(s) holding out the longest. As Maître Capello alluded to, in contemporary everyday speech only si il is found outside of the frozen expression s'il te/vous plaît but in writing the forms s'il(s) are a prescriptive rule (although Grevisse mentions some si il in Stendhal and Vian).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top