Si no le metes prisa no vamos a llegar.

zeppo

Senior Member
USA
Si no le metes prisa no vamos a llegar.

The above is from the wordreference dictionary listing for 'meter prisa'.

But why is "le" used instead of "te"?
 
  • Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    But why is "le" used instead of "te"?
    In the wordreference dictionary, you can see "v prnl" after certain verb entries, followed by "Verbo que se conjuga con un pronombre átono (me, te, se) que concuerda con el sujeto (lavarse, irse, enojarse)" in the pop-up [the mouseover]. The verb in your sentence "Si no le metes prisa no vamos a llegar" doesn't fit in this category. It doesn't use "te" because it is not used as one of these verbs -- "verbos pronominales." These are also called reflexive verbs. (In your sentence, the "le" is used as an indirect object -- the person or thing that indirectly receives the action of the verb.)

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    Last edited:

    franzjekill

    Senior Member
    Español rioplatense
    In your sentence, the "le" is used as an indirect object -
    Entiendo exactamente eso, que "le" representa aquello a lo cual hay que "meterle prisa": conducir, hacer las maletas, terminar de arreglarse...
    "v prml" after certain verb entries, followed by "Verbo que se conjuga con un pronombre átono me, te, se que concuerda con el sujeto (lavarse, irse, enojarse)."
    Con el verbo dar: Si no te das prisa, no vamos a llegar.
    El significado es el mismo que en el caso anterior.
     

    zeppo

    Senior Member
    USA
    Maybe I should have added the English translation that is also provided:
    If you don't hurry, we won't get there.
    If you don't get a move on, we won't get there.

    So I'm still not getting it. "Te" exists as an indirect object, so to me, anyway I look at it, it should be "te" instead of "le".
     

    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    Maybe I should have added the English translation that is also provided:
    If you don't hurry, we won't get there.
    If you don't get a move on, we won't get there.

    So I'm still not getting it. "Te" exists as an indirect object, so to me, anyway I look at it, it should be "te" instead of "le".
    That's not an accurate translation of " si no le metes prisa".
    "Si no le metes prisa " means " unless you hurry him up", that "le" is the equivalent of your "him".
    "If you don't hurry" means " si no te das prisa/te apresuras ".
     

    zeppo

    Senior Member
    USA
    That's not an accurate translation of " si no le metes prisa".
    "Si no le metes prisa " means " unless you hurry him up", that "le" is the equivalent of your "him".
    "If you don't hurry" means " si no te das prisa/te apresuras ".
    My first thought was that it was saying: "If you don't hurry yourself up...", which is not an unheard of phrase in English, but I wouldn't know about Spanish. The "le" puzzled me, though.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Search the Web for "meterle prisa"—it evidently has a meaning.
    I found several examples, including this one:
    Nadie puede meterle prisa a un genio.
    Is there a person in the context of your example, a "him" or a "her" who you are urging to hurry?
    Otherwise, I suspect that you could also consider reading "le" as a pronoun for "the task at hand";
    "le" isn't always a human being.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Search the Web for "meterle prisa"—it evidently has a meaning.
    I found several examples, including this one:

    Is there a person in the context of your example, a "him" or a "her" who you are urging to hurry?
    Otherwise, I suspect that you could also consider reading "le" as a pronoun for "the task at hand";
    "le" isn't always a human being.
    That isn't relevant here, because the OP is talking about the example given in the WR dictionary. See here, and scroll to "meter prisa."
     
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