Siad i siadcie

NotNow

Senior Member
English
I know that siadaj and siadajcie are the imperative forms of siadac. Where the heck do siad and siadcie come from?

I will be grateful to anyone who can solve this mystery for me.
 
  • e7ka

    Member
    Polish - English
    Siad is a command we use when we want dog to sit down. You can say it only to a dog, not to human.
    There is no word like 'siadcie' in Polish. There's a word - 'siądźcie' and you can say it to a group of people (not to one person), and I think that it's little more polite than 'siadajcie'
    These words are also the imperative forms of siadać ;)
     
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    NotNow

    Senior Member
    English
    Thanks. How do you tell two or more dogs to sit? Also, where does the word siad come from? What's the infinitive?
     

    e7ka

    Member
    Polish - English
    „Siądźcie” is the imperative form of „siąść”, not of „siadać”.
    yes, you're right, sorry

    We tell two or more dogs to sit 'siad', too ;)
    and infinitive of siad is "siadać"
    "Siad' is also a noun. When we use word 'siad' while talking about people it means that they are sitting (especially on the floor) in a special way (for example on a PE lessons) I send you a link of the photo.
     
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    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    Grammatically siad is noun used here as command. You also use siad when commanding two dogs (or people to sit), it's just a state you order somebody to take; plural of siad is probably siady, but I'm not sure if this noun has plural (it should have, I don't have Polish dictionary by me), nonetheless it's rarely used in even non-order contexts.

    Noun siad needn't be used as direct order, it can also mean simple sitting pose used on PE, check http://sjp.pwn.pl/lista.php?co=siad if you understand Polish for different sitting poses. It mustn't be used outside of gymnastics context, for taking a sitting pose in daily context spoczęcie (from v. spoczywać, resting) should do.
     

    NotNow

    Senior Member
    English
    Thanks everyone. I finally understand.

    Is waruj the only way to tell a dog to get down? How do to tell a dog to fetch and to roll over?
     

    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    Of course it's not only way, but it's generally accepted; you can teach your dog to roll on 'siad' command for example! :)

    I know other order for dog to lie, leżeć (lit. lie down; in infinitive). It's quite funny that we use infinitive as very direct imperative mood (imperative of leżeć is leż, but nobody uses it when ordering a dog).

    The classical word for fetch is aport (you can see latin influence here), it's another noun used as order to dog (for other meanings see http://sjp.pwn.pl/lista.php?co=aport).

    I don't know the word for 'roll over', here (http://dogs.pl/tresura/) are some commands, but i don't see one for rolling neither.
     
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