Sicilian: Scowl

mamette

New Member
English, USA
When we were kids, our Sicilian father called a scowl or frown "fungia". That's the way it sounded to us, "foongia". I have been unable to find a translation. Any ideas?
 
  • oetzi

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy
    The word is "funcia"; in Italian you would say "muso" (literal or figurative) or "broncio" (figurative).
     

    mamette

    New Member
    English, USA
    Thanks for such a speedy response! So "funcia" is Sicilian dialect and "muso" or "broncio" are Italian?
     

    oetzi

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy
    That's right. "Muso" means "face, mug", while "broncio" means "sulk".
    "Fare il muso" and "avere il broncio" are equivalent expressions, meaning "to sulk, to be in a sulk" or alike.
     

    oetzi

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy
    You are welcome.
    Just one warning: "muso" usually indicates the face of an animal. If you want to use it in relation to a person, you must be very careful, since either you are in a close confidence with them, or you seriously risk being offensive.

    On the other hand, "muso" is currently used in a few expressions, such as "fare (avere) il muso" or "a brutto muso, a muso duro" (bluntly).
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English

    JVadala

    New Member
    English
    My father was second generation Sicilian-American and a lot of little Sicilianisms were used when I was growing up and this was one we used in that context in my Sicilian-American family too. A ‘fungia face’ and the phonetic spelling you included, meant a fussy scowl.

    Other words were figgadenia for the cactus fruit we’d eat, agita, Nunu instead of Nono etc.. it was so nice to see this post. I was just telling my partner about this phrase we used. Yours was the only reference I’ve found so far. Interesting!
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    My father was second generation Sicilian-American and a lot of little Sicilianisms were used when I was growing up and this was one we used in that context in my Sicilian-American family too. A ‘fungia face’ and the phonetic spelling you included, meant a fussy scowl.

    Other words were figgadenia for the cactus fruit we’d eat, agita, Nunu instead of Nono etc.. it was so nice to see this post. I was just telling my partner about this phrase we used. Yours was the only reference I’ve found so far. Interesting!
    'Funcia' also means mushroom in Sicilian.

    'Fichi d'india' are my second favourite fruit, fresh figs being my most favourite. We know them here as prickly pears or Indian figs.

    Opuntia ficus-indica - Wikipedia

    'Nonnu' is what Sicilians call their grandfather. It may vary in different parts of Italy.
     
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