siedziała zaparta w fotelu

zzjing

Member
Chinese - Mandarin
– Możemy iść, kochanie – zacząłem z nie całkiem naturalnym ożywieniem, wchodząc do kabiny poprzez czerwone smugi światła, za którymi widziałem tylko majaczącą sylwetkę Harey. Głos mnie zawiódł; siedziała zaparta w fotelu, przeplótłszy łokcie pod poręczami.

What does "zaparta" mean here? Also, what does "przeplótłszy łokcie pod poręczami" look like exactly?
 
  • jasio

    Senior Member
    Her posture suggested that she was unwilling to go, no matter what. Perhaps pushing the body as deep as possible in the armchair. The arms of the armchair must not have been solid, so she placed her elbows below the arms, putting the forearms in a way that it was impossible to grab her forcibly.

    At least this is how I understand that.
     

    zzjing

    Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    I believe she put her arm like in the picture so as not to be removed from the armchair.
    I was imagining putting the arm around the other side, which I believe is what jasio was suggesting. I could be wrong though.

    Also, what's a good translation for the first part of the sentence, i.e. "siedziała zaparta w fotelu" and the word "zaparta" in particular?
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    Also, what's a good translation for the first part of the sentence, i.e. "siedziała zaparta w fotelu" and the word "zaparta" in particular?
    Perhaps pushing the body as deep as possible in the armchair - pushing her legs against the floor. Or any other 'locked' position.

    "Zaparty" is a passive participle of "zapierać" - this is what you do when you want to move a heavy object, like a wardrobe, and you push your back against the wall to gain additional strength.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Also, what's a good translation for the first part of the sentence, i.e. "siedziała zaparta w fotelu" and the word "zaparta" in particular?
    In that context, 'zaprzeć się' means leaning heavily back so as not to be removed. To do so, she used all her four limbs, the legs pushing against the ground and the arms against the armchair side rails.
     
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    jasio

    Senior Member
    The author says 'pod' poręczami, not 'nad' poręczami, so he must have meant the type of an armchair I showed in the picture.
    @zaffy, do me a favour, stop quarreling and start reading my posts more carefully instead! I clearly wrote that it would NOT be possible on a traditional armchair. Since apparently you did not understand what I had had in mind, I attached a link to the photo showing a type of armchair on which sucha a position WOULD NOT BE POSSIBLE!
     

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    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    @zaffy, do me a favour, stop quarreling
    Nowhere did I quarrel, you seem to be overreacting. Melissa is said to work a treat, so you might want to have some :)
    I just had a feeling your picture and post were misleading for the OP and others...but it was just me :)
     
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    jasio

    Senior Member
    Nowhere did I quarrel, you seem to be overreacting. Melissa is said to work a treat, so you might want to have some :)
    I just had a feeling your picture and post were misleading for the OP and others...but it was just me :)
    If I see a nasty manipulation by putting into my mouth the words or thoughts I had not said, I may need melissa indeed. :mad:
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I was imagining putting the arm around the other side, which I believe is what jasio was suggesting. I could be wrong though.
    The armchair must have looked like the one I pasted in post numer 7 because she put her arms 'under' not 'over' the side rails.
     

    zzjing

    Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    The armchair must have looked like the one I pasted in post numer 7 because she put her arms 'under' not 'over' the side rails.
    I understand. I just thought it could be done the other way, but it turns out to be difficult.
     

    zzjing

    Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    In that context, 'zaprzeć się' means leaning heavily back so as not to be removed. To do so, she used all her four limbs, the legs pushing against the ground and the arms against the armchair side rails.
    Perhaps pushing the body as deep as possible in the armchair - pushing her legs against the floor. Or any other 'locked' position.

    "Zaparty" is a passive participle of "zapierać" - this is what you do when you want to move a heavy object, like a wardrobe, and you push your back against the wall to gain additional strength.
    Got it. Thanks for the explanation.
     
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