siege & besiege

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Goblin0612

Member
Chinese & English
Two words troubled me so much, i wonder the difference between them.

If i wanna describe the situation that the suspects was surrounded by police and there was an officer shouted to them outside, which word is better?

Thanks!!!!
 
  • Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Hi, can you give the exact sentence in which you want to use the word?

    Also, please use correct English to the best of your ability - this includes capitalising the word "I" and not using slang/chat words like "wanna".
     

    Goblin0612

    Member
    Chinese & English
    Hi, can you give the exact sentence in which you want to use the word?

    Also, please use correct English to the best of your ability - this includes capitalising the word "I" and not using slang/chat words like "wanna".
    Sorry, I won’t write like that again, I promise.

    No, I just have no definite sentences to express. I just have no idea to distinguish them. They are just the same in my opinion, though I think it is not.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    You might want to check the WR dictionary for these words. You will see there that "siege" is only a noun, "besiege" is only a verb. If you are still confused after reading those definitions, we can help with whatever questions you have then.
     

    Franstralia

    New Member
    English - Australian
    They mean the same thing but the structure of the sentence and context determines which word to use. Besiege means the same thing as a siege (the hostile action of surrounding an enemy force and preventing them from escaping). However besiege allows you to apply the word siege in personal situations. For example:

    'We are besieged' is correct - 'We are siege' is incorrect. You can't use the words 'sieged', 'sieging' as they are incorrect. This is where the word 'besiege' come into use. You can say besieged and besieging. The only variant to the word 'siege' is 'sieges'.

    However you can use the word siege in the same context as the word besiege. For example 'We are under siege' means the exact same thing as 'We are besieged'.

    Other sentences to help you differentiate the uses of the words:

    'We are besieging the enemy force'
    'We will besiege their castle'

    'There is a siege going on'
    'The siege has ended'
    'Our city is under siege'
    'They are planning to lay siege to us'

    Hope this helps.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You can lay siege to a town/castle/etc or you can besiege a town/castle/etc, and then the town/castle/etc., is besieged or under siege.

    "The emperor's army surrounded the town. The siege lasted two years."
    "The emperor's army besieged the town for two years."
    "The emperor's army laid siege to the town but had to lift the siege when winter came." i.e. to lift = to end
    "The emperor's besieging army could not find supplies in the bitterly cold weather."
     
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