Siesta

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Włoskipolak 72

Member
Polish
The word "Siesta" from Spanish , comes from the“Hora Sexta” in Latin the time between 12 and 15 in which a break from daily work was taken.

How do you say siesta , a short nap in your language?

In Polish : drzemka /ˈdʐɛm.ka/ or poobiednia ( afternoon ) drzemka , gara , kima , but I think in some regions peolple say also sjesta !?
In Italian : la pennichella ( pomeridiana ) , sonnellino pomeridiano , pisolino from verb. pisolare , fare la siesta.
 
  • Olaszinhok

    Senior Member
    Standard Italian
    ''Pennichella'' is a word used only in Rome and surroundings. It is understood in the rest of Italy thanks to the It. TV using a Roman-influenced slang.
    Yes, it is but I have to say that it is quite common in different parts of Central Italy (at least) and in my view, it is a very beautiful and meaningful word. Besides, I vividly remember having found it in newspapers and books as well.
     
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    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Although there is "σιέστα" in Greek, I don't think it's common. Most people would use "μεσημεριανός ύπνος" or "μεσημεριανή ανάπαυση" ("midday sleep" or "midday rest')-- [mesimerjanós ípnos] , [mesimerjaní anápafsi].
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    ''Pennichella'' is a word used only in Rome and surroundings. It is understood in the rest of Italy thanks to the It. TV using a Roman-influenced slang.
    I think '' Pennichella '' is quite widespread in central Italy anyway i find it quite nice , just like “Pisolino” a diminutive of "pìsolo", derived from "pisolare", of uncertain origin but commonly used in Pistoia in Tuscany and in the rest of Italy.
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    Although there is "σιέστα" in Greek, I don't think it's common. Most people would use "μεσημεριανός ύπνος" or "μεσημεριανή ανάπαυση" ("midday sleep" or "midday rest')-- [mesimerjanós ípnos] , [mesimerjaní anápafsi].
    Thanks "μεσημεριανός ύπνος" sounds quite interesting :rolleyes:
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:

    - sesta exists, from Latin (hora) sexta, but is only used in literature​
    - migdiada is probably the most common term for this, coming from migdia 'midday' + -ada (= 'action typical of midday')​
    · becaina and cabotada mean a nod but are commonly used with fer 'to do': fer una becaina/cabotada = 'take a nap')​
    -trencar el son literally means 'break the sleep'​
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I wonder if there is any language spoken in Europe (or even outside Europe) which does not use "siesta" or its forms in colloquial language. We Hungarians can even use a verb from siesta, sziesztázik. How about your language, like: siestar?
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Sestear has only seven occurrences in the historical Corpus del Español.
    What Corpus? If the ones of the RAE (CORDE, CREA...), they are really limited and they aren't representative. Sestear is not the most frequent verb but it isn't rare either. I'm sure I could easily find more than one hundred examples of use just in XXth Century. In fact, the Biblioteca Digital Hispánica -that isn't either a great corpus but it's better than the RAE's ones; at least for texts edited in Spain-, quotes 81 examples of use sestea between 1901 and 1975 (some of them might be repeated -diferent editions of the same book- though) while whatever Corpus you consulted gave back just one result in whatever time period you searched.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    What Corpus? If the ones of the RAE (CORDE, CREA...), they are really limited and they aren't representative
    That's why I didn't use them.

    Sestear has only seven occurrences in the historical Corpus del Español.
    Everybody here agrees with me that sestear is not a common word.

    And this thread isn't only about Spanish, so we'd better stop this.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Everybody here agrees with me that sestear is not a common word.

    And this thread isn't only about Spanish, so we'd better stop this.
    And the thread that you quoted might be too old to be resurrected so it's about time to make the question sestear (for now).
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    The story goes that an old gentleman (Welsh first language) was a bit of a malaprop. If he couldn't get his tongue around most English words, anything even more exotic such as Castilian would have flummoxed him further (although Spanish jota is pronounced like Welsh 'ch' and our vowels are quite similar - but he wouldn't have known this). Anyhow, coming across 'siesta' one day, he attempted something like 'SIGH-sista' (I give an English approximation.) Fortunately, there were no Spaniards on hand to hear him mangle their language ...)

    Now to give a Welsh word for siesta (as I can't think of an English one), I suppose I'd offer cyntun. This is rather unfortunate as the first (stressed) syllable resembles a vulgar English word in pronunciation. Now, the vowel in Welsh is schwa (but is stressed), so, and we don't have 'wedge' in our phonological system, I guess to English ears it sounds like 'wedge'. Consequently, the vulgarity is maintained. Sorry about that.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Russian culture doesn't have an exact analogue of Mediterranean siesta, to begin with (due to climatic differences mostly; the midday summer heat is rarely strong enough to prevent any productive work in the fields). A short nap after the main midday meal will be usually called descriptively when necessary (posleobédennyi ótdykh - ~"an afterdinner rest", or posleobédennyi són - ~"an afterdinner sleep"). The loanword "siyésta" (сиеста) can be used in a Russian context only jokingly.
     
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    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    In Macedonian: дремка (drémka) ['drɛm.ka] or попладневна дремка (popládnevna drémka) [pɔ'pɫadnɛvna 'drɛmka] lit. "afternoon's nap". See this thread too.
    Thanks , дремка (drémka) and drzemka share a common origin :  drzemać, drzemka, drzemota (»sen«, Leopolita), drzemliwy , Prasłowo; drěmati u wszystkich Słowian bez wyjątku; jest jednak i rus. drychat’, serb. drichati, słowień. drichmati, ‘drzemać’.

    Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego/drzemać - Wikiźródła, wolna biblioteka

    In Polish
    drzemka (noun) - sen · gara · pot.(commonly) kima · spanko , półsen ( drowse )
    kimać [ˈcĩmaʨ̑] (verb) - ( spać, drzemać, zdrzemnąć się, przysypiać, chrapnąć ), kimać: probably from Greek : κοιμάμαι (kimame) → spać , sleep .
     
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