sift v. sieve v. scoop up

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
Are sift and scoop up for these contexts identical?

"Largest sharks catch their food in an entirely different way. They sift millions of small animals out of the water like big whales do."

"With a big mouth this large, it can scoop up a lot of very tiny plankton, which is its main source of food."

Thank you.
 
  • hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Are sift and scoop up for these contexts identical?

    "Largest sharks catch their food in an entirely different way. They sift millions of small animals out of the water like big whales do."
    If "sift" above means
    to separate and keep the larger or thicker parts or pieces of (flour, etc.) with a sieve:
    , then something is strange because how can a fish have a sieve?

    Thank you.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It doesn't have to be the sort of sieve you find in a kitchen. It can be anything that works like a sieve.

    From the Wikipedia page on sharks: (emphasis mine)
    ...megamouth sharks make suction feeding more efficient by using the luminescent tissue inside of their mouths to attract prey in the deep ocean. This type of feeding requires gill rakers —long, slender filaments that form a very efficient sieve—analogous to the baleen plates of the great whales....
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    A sieve - also known as a "sift" or a "sifter"



    A scoop:



    You will see that the verbs indicate the respective use of both of these.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    You will see that the verbs indicate the respective use of both of these.[/QUOTE said:
    But are these verbs in a figurative meaning in these contexts?

    Thank you.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    No, they are used literally. What makes you think they are used figuratively?

    You can scoop things up with anything that can work as a scoop. You can sift things with anything that works like a sieve.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    No. It is the literal meaning. To sieve/sift = to separate one item from another by size - the shark and whales in question separate the plankton from water molecules through forcing the water that contains the plankton through narrow, bony channels in their mouth.

    To scoop = by use of the hands (or another part of the body, any structure or an instrument) to collect quantities of something.

    A picture of baleen showing how sharks and whales sieve plankton from the water:

     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No. It is the literal meaning. To sieve/sift = to separate one item from another by size - the shark and whales in question separate the plankton from water molecules through forcing the water that contains the plankton through narrow, bony channels in their mouth.
    What does it mean by "by size" ?

    To scoop
    = by use of the hands (or another part of the body, any structure or an instrument) to collect quantities of something.

    Is the verb "to scoop" usually used for "eating process" such as the given example?

    Thank you.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    What does it mean by "by size" ?
    Things bigger in size than the "holes" in the sieve will not pass through the holes. Things smaller in size than the holes will pass through. Haven't you ever seen a sieve being used?
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Things bigger in size than the "holes" in the sieve will not pass through the holes. Things smaller in size than the holes will pass through. Haven't you ever seen a sieve being used?
    . Yes I see it, but I think in Turkish we do not concentrate on its this kind of workng principle.

    Thank you.
     
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