sigh

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arjun78

Senior Member
India-Hindi
Hi,

We normally say, 'he bristled at her idea' and so on. Can we use 'sigh' in a certain way to mean he was unhappy with her idea. He sighed over her idea. Will that work?

Arjun
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There are a great many types of sighs so the context or the sentence would need to be more specific. For example, he might sigh because her idea of putting little hats on the puppies was so sweet!
     

    arjun78

    Senior Member
    India-Hindi
    There are a great many types of sighs so the context or the sentence would need to be more specific. For example, he might sigh because her idea of putting little hats on the puppies was so sweet!
    Well, I meant sighing in frustration. However, my point is the preposition that I can use - at or over?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'd say the same as E2E4 in post #2, Arjun. (Sigh over sounds more like Myridon's puppy thing: sighing in pleasure.) I'm not sure sigh is the best verb for conveying 'frustration', though: I'd prefer bristle ~ it's more prickly:)
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'd say (seriously) it's a bit of a poor definition, Majlo: complain = 'make a noise to express disapproval', sigh = 'make very little noise because you know it won't do any good' [James' resignation, above].

    (What's PWN, by the way?)
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I don't think there's a lot of difference between "sigh over" and "sigh at". It's a matter of personal preference. They seem to be used in the same circumstances.
    I agree the definition is a bad one.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    If I read "he sighed at (or "over") her idea," I wouldn't think of frustration, but long-suffering resignation. For frustration, I would prefer something like "exhaled through pinched lips" (which is not an idiom and isn't very good).
     

    4TranslatingEnglish

    Senior Member
    Good old fashion Portuguese
    I always have the same question when it comes to express emotions with a verb: what's the preposition?

    He sighed / cried / laughed, etc

    in / with / of / from

    despair / fear / joy, etc

    Is it up to personal choice? Does it depend on which verb is used?

    Thanks in advance.
     
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