sign a contract for an apartment

popup

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,

I looked up in the dictionary and got to know I can say "sign a contract with somebody". But can I say "sign a contract for something"?

For example:
Tom is going to sign a contract for an apartment that he wants to rent.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    While we would normally use the word lease when referring to a contract to rent an apartment, it seems that the apartment was just an example in the original post and the real question is about using the word for when referring to a contract in general. The answer is: yes, you can sign a contract for something. "I just signed a contract for 3,000 bricks" makes perfect sense, if one wants that many bricks.
     

    popup

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    OK, that's useful expression to me! Thank you for your further information, Bennymix!
     

    popup

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello,

    I have a further question about this: if I simply say sign for the apartment, will the listener understand what I mean? Is that idiomatic?

    If not, is there any briefer phrase to express the same meaning?
     
    I think 'sign for an apartment', without context, may be a little vague. We have an expression like that for deliveries.
    Man at my door: "Here's your book. Just sign for it."
    "OK, it's not for me; it's for my wife, but I'll sign for it, if that's OK."

    It often means, 'give a signature showing that something has been received or borrowed.'

    "I'll lease an apartment" {or, "I've leased an apartment.") is pretty brief, isn't it? Or, in more detail, "I signed a lease for an apartment, today."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top