sign in or sign up (for)

TeddiePooh

New Member
Chinese
Hi, could anyone tell me which is correct?
1. The competition sounds easy and the prize is big, so a lot of workers sign in.
2. The competition sounds easy and the prize is big, so a lot of workers sign up.
3. The competition sounds easy and the prize is big, so a lot of workers sign up for the game.

Many thanks.
 
  • TeddiePooh

    New Member
    Chinese
    Hi Erebos12345
    I checked Merriam Webster on-line dictionary and it says sign in means "to sign your name on a list, in a book, etc., to show that you have arrived."
    Example:
    The receptionist signed the guests in.
    In that case, I would go for 2 and 3.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, sign in means to indicate your arrival (much like logging on or in to a website).

    Sign up for something means to join it.
     
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