Siktir

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Chazzwozzer

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi there,

Siktir is the vulgar way to express rage, happiness, disbelief and funk in Turkish.

A legend tells that Turkish interjection "siktir" became widely known by many Europeans as a result of Ottoman siege. Later on, according to the legend, this interjection came into being in some languages.

I'm a bit stymied there. I've got no notion if we can take that sense and trace it all the way back to Ottoman times, though.

A friend of mine claims siktir, borrowed from Turkish, has become a part of Romanian everyday speech.

A columnist believes siktir has been in both Italian and Greek as well.

Now, I'm not asking you for an equivalent of siktir in your language, but I ask you to testify these claims and cue me in on the usage of this expression in your language.

Thanks for all your replies.
 
  • robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    I've actually never heard that word in Romanian. It maybe has changed form entirely. Wait for other replies!

    :) robbie
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    The closest could be the verb "a sictiri".

    Ex: Hai sictir! (go away!)

    It comes from the Turkish siktir.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Mulţumesc, Robbie.

    I replaced hassiktir with siktir after you posted. Hassiktir is too Turkish and slightly less popular than siktir.

    I've also just found it on Urban Dictionary and it's used exactly in the same way!

    About your example, can you please answer the following questions?

    -What does "hai" literally mean in Romanian?
    -How offensive can sictir be?
    -Does sic also mean anything in Romanian? (Sik is the vulgar expression of penis in Turkish)

    By the way, I just found out that it(siktir) is also used in Armenian.

    Can a speaker of Armenian answer the following?

    -Does siktir necessarily imply a kind of angry dismissal?
     

    übermönch

    Senior Member
    World - 1.German, 2.Russian, 3.English
    After searching it in Yandex I found a funny flamewar in Russian on
    http://www.kavkazweb.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=97491&sid=429f905f98b3d52dd72133a1ca63c6be

    The topic turns out to be is who's the inferior one, Azeris or Armenians. An azeri user implies that Armenian language is so poor that they had to borrow "siktir" from Azeri, while an Armenian answers that it just prooves that pure Armenian was not as dirty. Oh, well, and the rest is your typical flame war/hate speech :D.

    So, it prooves that the two languages also use that word.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    After searching it in Yandex I found a funny flamewar in Russian on
    http://www.kavkazweb.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=97491&sid=429f905f98b3d52dd72133a1ca63c6be

    The topic turns out to be is who's the inferior one, Azeris or Armenians. An azeri user implies that Armenian language is so poor that they had to borrow "siktir" from Azeri, while an Armenian answers that it just prooves that pure Armenian was not as dirty. Oh, well, and the rest is your typical flame war/hate speech :D.

    So, it prooves that the two languages also use that word.
    Interesting!:thumbsup:

    Now that makes me wonder if other Turkic languages, like Turkmen, have siktir in their languages. I assume Azeri borrowed siktir from Turkish and Armenian from Azeri. But, if siktir goes back to Ottoman times, then Armenians should have used siktir before Azeris, since they were living in Ottoman Empire.

    Wish we had speakers of other Turkic languages here. (Azeri, Tatar, Turkmen, Chuvash, Gagauz etc.)
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Mulţumesc, Robbie.

    About your example, can you please answer the following questions?

    -What does "hai" literally mean in Romanian?
    -How offensive can sictir be?
    -Does sic also mean anything in Romanian? (Sik is the vulgar expression of penis in Turkish)
    Merhaba Chazzwozzer!

    "Hai" means "come on!" and it is an onomatopoeic word derived from the word "haide" that has a Turkish counterpart (haydi).

    Sictir is very offensive, because if you say it to a person it proves that you don't have any respect for him/her. I don't live in Romania, so unfortunately I don't know how things are now. Maybe it’s more acceptable today.

    Sic does not, as far as I know, mean penis in Romanian. But "sic" does exist.

    *Sic = adv. a Latin word used in-between brackets meaning "like this" (never used it myself). :D

    *Sâc (old spelling sîc) = corresponding with Turkish sik. used to make fun of somebody. Ex: Sâc, sâc I'm better than you! (this is quite juvenile):p

    Hope this Helped!

    :) robbie
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    We have what is one of my favourite expressions "Άει σιχτίρ" (Άει means "go" and is Greek). Σιχτίρ has also "become" a verb, "σιχτιρίζω" .

    My etymological dictionary says we took it from the Turkish sikdim which is the aorist (past) of the verb sikmek.

    It's not extremely offensive but offensive it is!
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Merhaba Chazzwozzer!

    "Hai" means "come on!" and it is an onomatopoeic word derived from the word "haide" that has a Turkish counterpart (haydi).

    Sictir is very offensive, because if you say it to a person it proves that you don't have any respect for him/her. I don't live in Romania, so unfortunately I don't know how things are now. Maybe it’s more acceptable today.

    Sic does not, as far as I know, mean penis in Romanian. But "sic" does exist.

    *Sic = adv. a Latin word used in-between brackets meaning "like this" (never used it myself). :D

    *Sâc (old spelling sîc) = corresponding with Turkish sik. used to make fun of somebody. Ex: Sâc, sâc I'm better than you! (this is quite juvenile):p

    Hope this Helped!

    :) robbie
    So sâc(sik) and haide(haydi) also exist in Romanian language.
    That's quite interesting to know, really. Thank you. :)

    We have what is one of my favourite expressions "Άει σιχτίρ" (Άει means "go" and is Greek). Σιχτίρ has also "become" a verb, "σιχτιρίζω" .

    My etymological dictionary says we took it from the Turkish sikdim which is the aorist (past) of the verb sikmek.

    It's not extremely offensive but offensive it is!
    You basically tell someone "I fucked!" to dismiss then. Sikmek is to fuck and siktim is of course I fucked. And it's not that offensive! :D Seems it developed in meaning in Greek.

    Ireney, it's sihtiri, right? I've just seen it on this.
    Siktir Get out of here! Sihtiri

    Thank you!
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Chazz yes, we use both "άει σιχτίρ" and "άει σιχτίρι".

    When I say it's not that offensive I didn't mean that it's meaning is not offensive. It's just we are hmmmm less prudish? more in need of having our mouths washed with tons of soap? The thing is we swear a lot :D

    By the way, I think we (the Greeks that is) have messed things up a bit. "Αει" means "go" (imperative). You say that siktir means "I fucked". So what we basically say is "Go I fucked"? LOL!
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Siktim is actually I fucked, which your etymological dictionary(I gotta have one too!) suggests as the origin of Greek word. :)
    My etymological dictionary says we took it from the Turkish siktim which is the aorist (past) of the verb sikmek.
    Siktim: I fucked.
    Sikmek: to fuck
    Siktir: I think it's like Get fucked, I don't know how to translate it, though. It's what we say in Turkish to mean "fuck off!" like you do.
    Siktir git: It's also used. "Git" is "go" then it means "Get fucked and go!" I think it's pretty much like Greek usage.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    I see! So we didn't f***ed up! Thanks for all the info Chazz! :)
    (a good etymological dictionary [some are pure poo] is fun!)
     

    Mihai

    New Member
    Romania
    Well I'm from Romania and i hear this expresion quite often these days.
    I hear it at radio, i hear it at TV and a lot on te streets too.
    We say: "hai sictir" which i think it translates in: "Fuck Off!", or "Go Fuck Yourself!". Anyway, it's a "heavy" one, very offensive. :)
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    Very interesting topic. Russian doesn't have this word, we do quite OK with our own curse words. However, I was interested in seeing if Serbian would have it, since they have a high percentage of Turskish borrowing. I searched for the cyrillic words
    сиктир - siktir
    ай сиктир - <h>ai siktir

    and although wasn't able to find Serbian, I did find many Bulgarian sites with these words. I even found an expression :
    ай сиктир бре (ai siktir bre). This, I thought, was funny since bre (I'm told by Serbians) is also Turkish.

    Hopefully, natives of Bulgarian and Serbian could shed some light on this topic.
     

    Toxina

    New Member
    Romanian
    Indeed...."Hai sictir!" is quite used in Romania, mainly when you wan't to be let alone...but is offensive so...don't use it:p
    "sictir" can also be used to express the loathing or the boredom of someone when he/she must do something...but again not very polite.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Very interesting topic. Russian doesn't have this word, we do quite OK with our own curse words. However, I was interested in seeing if Serbian would have it, since they have a high percentage of Turskish borrowing. I searched for the cyrillic words
    сиктир - siktir
    ай сиктир - <h>ai siktir

    and although wasn't able to find Serbian, I did find many Bulgarian sites with these words. I even found an expression :
    ай сиктир бре (ai siktir bre). This, I thought, was funny since bre (I'm told by Serbians) is also Turkish.

    Hopefully, natives of Bulgarian and Serbian could shed some light on this topic.
    It is indeed Turkish, check this thread for bre.

    I, as a Turk, would say "Hassiktir be!" (It's how we spell Hai Sictir in Turkish and we only use be instead bre in this context.) if I was extremely annoyed/disappointed/pissed off...

    Indeed...."Hai sictir!" is quite used in Romania, mainly when you wan't to be let alone...but is offensive so...don't use it:p
    "sictir" can also be used to express the loathing or the boredom of someone when he/she must do something...but again not very polite.
    Really? Well, it's very rare to ask to be left alone saying "Hassiktir!" here. I would say "Siktir git!"(Fuck off!) instead.
     
    Normal, in Greece we use it just like we do with other turkish words, actually, it is offensive to say "Άι γαμήσου" (=fuck off) in greek but it's not when you say "Hai Siktir" instead..
     

    YooHoo

    New Member
    Armenian
    i'm armenian... and yes, some people do sometimes use "siktir" to signal an angry dismissal. however, its almost never implied with the literal turkish meaning including any reference to "penis" or anything. it's just used as an angry dismissal. for instance, within a conversation, siktir may be used like "get the f*** out of here."

    and of course, it is offensive.

    when armenians do use it, we DO NOT USE IT AND TREAT IT AS IF IT WERE AN ARMENIAN WORD. we are aware of it's origin and use it knowingly. as you all know, turks & armenians have lived side by side for years and so this exchange is understandable. << Off-topic. >>

    again, to answer your question, siktir is SOMETIMES used in armenian conversations, but not as an armenian word. we don't have such a offensive word, so you may often hear this language during a bad argument or something of that sort...
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    In Bosnian/Serbian/Croatian it is sikter, and is a rude way of saying "get lost", close but not quite as rude as "f*ck off". Bosnians are sometimes warned not to use this word under any circumstances when visiting Turkey, as supposedly in Turkish it has a much more offensive/vulgar connotation than in our use.

    i'm armenian... and yes, some people do sometimes use "siktir" to signal an angry dismissal. however, its almost never implied with the literal turkish meaning including any reference to "penis" or anything. it's just used as an angry dismissal. for instance, within a conversation, siktir may be used like "get the f*** out of here."
    This is pretty much exactly like here.
     
    Last edited:

    tishun

    New Member
    Bulgarian
    Hi guys,

    I coincidentally came across this topic and decided to shed some light.

    In Bulgaria "ай сиктир!" (which I believe is the same as the word "siktir" you are discussing) is very often used when expressing some sort of frustration. Typical example being attempting and failing to do some task several times. I've also heard it being used to indicate ironical remark, e.g. person A comes to a conclusion that person B finds obvious and person B indicates this by using this expression.

    As far as I know it has Turkish origin and is mostly used in the more rural parts of the country.
     
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