Simply create a user account and subscribe to your...

Eddie Kim

Member
Korean
Hi.

One of my friends just showed me several sentences and asked me to pick up the sentence that is wrong, but I can't find any wrong sentence.

Here are the sentences:

If you have trouble catching your favorite shows on TV, come to TV geeks.com to watch them anytime you like. (a) We have thousands of videos from TV shows new and old.
(b) The most popular shows available on your website change every month, depending on the number of hits. (c) Simply create a user account and subscribe to your favorite programs.


There is one more sentence left, but I will stop here because I think it's not necessary and will be against the rule.

My friend says the answer is (C), but he doesn't know why the sentence is wrong, and neither do I.
I need your help.
 
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  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    The sentence looks all right to me (assuming the spellings are all right in AE). Why does your friend think it's wrong when he can't see why it's wrong?
     

    Eddie Kim

    Member
    Korean
    All I know for sure is that my friend got that problem from one of his friends, and learned that the answer is C, but he doesn't know why.
    That's why he asked me.
    Maybe his friend is teasing him with that problem because it is too subtle.
    He says the answer is associated with reading comprehension.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't see what reading comprehension's got to do with correct grammar and spelling.
     
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    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Surely the incorrect one is (b) not (c). :confused:
    (b) "The most popular shows available on your website change every month, depending on the number of hits." implies to me that it's the viewer's or customer's website on which the TV shows are displayed. They must mean "...on our website..."?
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with DonnyB. However, you sometimes hear the colloquial your in reference to something you're going to use and not to something you own. For example, I've heard railway announcers say things like This is your 9:15 to Brighton. It's not my 9:15. It's the railway company's 9:15. I'm just getting on it. But I've never heard your instead of our in reference to a website.
     
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