since some schooldays

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cornúpeta

Member
Spanish-spanish
Hi there!, I'm doing my on-line English examination and the ask me if this phrase "I have a friend that I've known since some schooldays" is right or there is one word in it which must be removed. Maybe the right phrase is "I have a friend that I've known since schooldays", but I'm not sure, anyone could help me with this?

Thanks in advance, I'm happy to be here:)!!!
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi cornúpeta

    I agree with you: "since some schooldays" sounds very odd - the "some" is superfluous:).
     

    cornúpeta

    Member
    Spanish-spanish
    Hi cornúpeta

    I agree with you: "since some schooldays" sounds very odd - the "some" is superfluous:).
    thank you, they've corrected my exam and yes, we're right, the "some" is superfluous

    it's exciting to learn your language!!!
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    "since schooldays" also looks/sounds "odd" to me. For one thing, I don't think "schoolday" is a recognized close compound, any more than "schoolyear" is. In AE, at least, we have "school days" and "school years."

    I think the idiomatic way of saying "I have a friend that I've known since schooldays" in AE would be something like one of the following:

    I have a friend that I've known since our school days.
    I have a friend that I've known since we were in school together.

    In AE, I think the usual implication here would be that the "school" level was elementary school. It might possibly be high (secondary) school, but would not be post-secondary. If the "school" were a college or university, the idiomatic way of saying this in AE would be,

    I have a friend that I've known since our college days.
    I have a friend that I've known since we were in college together.

    Note that in AE, we would use "college" even if the institution was formally called a "university." "College" is used in other varieties of English to describe a secondary school, but in AE it is so restricted to post-secondary ("university" level) that some secondary schools with "college" in their name have added "high school," e.g. "Xavier College High School" to make it clear that they do not provide a university-level education. Differences in school terminology are a common trap for English language learners whose instruction concentrates on British or Commonwealth English.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Schooldays" works for me, Fabulist - although I might well write it as two words "school days". Here's Shakespeare with the two-word version:
    Tetchy and wayward was thy infancy
    Thy school days frightful, desperate, wild and furious
    (Richard III)


    "Schooldays"/"school days" for me would mean - today - somewhere between the ages of 5 and 16/18:).
     
    Last edited:

    cornúpeta

    Member
    Spanish-spanish
    Thank you very much indeed, I'm learning a lot in this forum, thanks to friends like you.

    My best regards from Spain, S-W Europe!!!
     
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