<Since therefore> or <Therefore since>

ebrahim

Senior Member
Persian
Hi,

I wonder why here the writer uses 'Since therefore' instead of 'Therefore since'. If it was "
Therefore since" I would understand it as 'Thus, because', but what about this permutation?

"
Since therefore neither rebellion nor submission was practicable in religious terms, all the energy of the age was concentrated on a complete revolution of the content of life, while orthodox ecclesiastical forms were preserved. The only consequence could be that men were denied all real means of direct expression. (Benjamin 79)"

Film Theory and Contemporary Hollywood Movies, chapter two
: The Supernatural in Neo-baroque Hollywood, by Sean Cubitt
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It must link in someway to what goes before. What went before gives "therefore neither A nor B was practical"

    He can introduce all of this chunk with since:

    Since (they see from the last bit of evidence that) A and B are impossible they put their energy into a complete revolution.
     

    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It must link in someway to what goes before. What went before gives "therefore neither A nor B was practical"

    He can introduce all of this chunk with since:

    Since (they see from the last bit of evidence that) A and B are impossible they put their energy into a complete revolution.
    So, I got from your comment that 'Since therefore' is not same as 'therefore since' rather it simply means 'therefore'. Wrong?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    To be honest, I don't know if the choice here is deliberate or not. I dont think it impacts much on the meaning as a native reader. I cannot say as to whether it makes a big difference in your translated text.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The emphasis would be different but I think the meaning would be the same:

    "
    Since therefore neither rebellion nor submission was practicable in religious terms, all the energy of the age was concentrated

    Since (for reasons already given) A +B were not practicable, all of C was concentrated...

    "
    Therefore since neither rebellion nor submission was practicable in religious terms, all the energy of the age was concentrated

    Therefore, (since A+B were not practicable), all of C was concentrated...

    (The other thread on "since therefore" doesn't seem relevant here, but I couldn't be bothered to read it either.)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top