single plants

mariana79

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello
In D.H Lawrence's Lady Chatterley, on a gardening scene. Mrs. Bolton separates young Colombines into single plants. What is she exactly doing? Digging out the young flowers and planting them separately? Separating them from other plants and planting them all together?

"Twenty-three!" said Mrs. Bolton, as she carefully separated the young columbines into single plants. "Twenty-three years since they brought him home."
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I imagine she had a bunch of columbines growing like this:

    HT-prick-out-seedlings-4.jpg


    and then she seperated them and either planted them into single pots or planted them out in the garden.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Columbines are perennials (you don't need to sow seed each year). You can divide a thriving plant that has grown into a clump by digging it up and separating it at the roots so that you end up with several small plants.

    Edit: Or perhaps DHL meant young seedlings, as in grassy's photo.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Like many flowers, columbines can spread quickly and then they can be split. You dig them up or tip them out of their pot, split the root-mass apart, and then replant to make separate new plants. From one original plant you may acquire ten or twenty.

    However, it's usually older plants rather than young ones that are divided in this way, so perhaps Grassy's idea of separating out small seedlings is more likely.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If it's spring, there will be new growth on the old plant, so this is maybe what DHL means by "young columbines".
     

    grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    You can divide a thriving plant that has grown into a clump by digging it up and separating it at the roots so that you end up with several small plants.
    Like many flowers, columbines can spread quickly and then they can be split.
    I thought about this too. I grow columbines myself and they are now in bloom here.
    The nice thing about them is that they self-seed like crazy, so once they're planted, you don't really need to divide them or sow them unless you want flowers of specific colors and plants in specific places.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think Constance's garden would have been pretty huge, so there would always have been a need for new plants to replace plants that have died, to fill in gaps, or to start up new flower beds. :)
     
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